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I am new Haskell and still trying to understand some of the basics. When writing recursive functions, I naturally write them in a recursive or tail recursive way without consciously selecting one over the other.

My question is:

  1. Given any recursive function, is there an easy way to convert it to tail-recursive?

  2. Given a tail-recursive function, is there an easy way to convert it to recursive?

Example Function

addOne [] = []
addOne (x:xs) = (x+1):addOne xs

Also, when writing a function, what is an easy way to tell if tail recursion is more appropriate over the alternative?

I appreciate any clarification.

Many thanks in advance!

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„Given a tail-recursive function, is there an easy way to convert it to recursive?“ – every tail recursive function is naturally recursive, isn’t it? –  Joachim Breitner Feb 24 '13 at 20:44
    
Yes, but this has nothing to do with my question. Writing a function that is recursive vs. tail-recursive are two completely different programs (syntactically) that can accomplish the same task. So one can be converted to other. –  AnchovyLegend Feb 24 '13 at 20:50
    
@Mi: No, a tail-recursive function is always recursive and a function is not "completely different" from itself, neither syntactically nor in any other regard. –  Niklas B. Feb 25 '13 at 0:43
    
@Niklas B. I never said tail-recursive function isn't always recursive, not sure where you got that from. Also, tail-recursion is substantially different from non-tail recursion. If in doubt, do some reading before commenting, to avoid coming off as a pseudo intellect. –  AnchovyLegend Feb 25 '13 at 1:07
    
@Mi: Ah, now you are using the term "non-tail recursion" for the first time. –  Niklas B. Feb 25 '13 at 1:12
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closed as not constructive by Don Stewart, Radu Murzea, Mario, Stephen Connolly, Stony Feb 24 '13 at 22:44

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm new to Haskell as well. From what I have read, explicit recursion is frowned upon in the Haskell community. Rather, Haskell encourages programmers to use standard functions such as map, filter, foldl, foldr, etc. which encapsulates common recursive operations. For example,

addOne [] = []
addOne (x:xs) = (x+1):addOne xs

can be written as

addOne xs = map (+1) xs

or, going a step further using point-free style, as

addOne = map (+1)

There are likely situations where these standard functions don't fit easily and you have to write your own recursive function. However, I believe they cover 90% of the cases where you might be tempted to implement explicit recursion.

I know this doesn't exactly answer your question, but I hope it gives you some ideas to consider.

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Given any recursive function, is there an easy way to convert it to tail-recursive?

No.

Given a tail-recursive function, is there an easy way to convert it to recursive?

Yes. Do nothing, and nothing remains undone (Lao Tse), as @Joachim Breitner already told you. But your definition of recursiveseems to deviate from the common one, so maybe you tell us what you mean.

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+1, for condescending useless answer. –  AnchovyLegend Feb 25 '13 at 1:26
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