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For example, if I have a function that is guaranteed to receive either 5 or 7 as an argument, I want the function to return 5 if received 7 and 7 if received 5 without using any conditions.

I was asked this in an interview and was pretty stumped, thanks.

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closed as too localized by BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft, kapep, Yan Sklyarenko, Soner Gönül, Waleed Khan Feb 25 '13 at 12:04

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While I think this is a good interview problem, as it gauges the interviewees ability to quick solve simple problems, I don't think this is a great question for this site - it is both trivial and useless. I'm voting to close as 'too localized'. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 25 '13 at 9:37
    
I just realized it's only a rephrased "swap without temp" question stackoverflow.com/questions/804706/… –  Martheen Feb 25 '13 at 10:00
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It should have been posted on codegolf.stackexchange.com –  Meysam Feb 25 '13 at 10:45
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Stumped is the correct answer, as they want to employ someone who writes code that is plain and obvious-to-the-reader, rather than peppering it with im-smarter-than-you snares at every return. –  John Mee Feb 25 '13 at 13:05
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7 Answers 7

up vote 86 down vote accepted

Simple arithmetic:

return 7 - input + 5;

(which can be simplified as return 12 - input;)

Let's say the input is 7:

return 7 - 7 + 5 --> return 5

Or if the input is 5:

return 7 - 5 + 5 --> return 7

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16  
+1, Even return 12 - input –  Ofiris Feb 24 '13 at 20:40
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That's incredible! Could you share the thought process behind this? –  davegri Feb 24 '13 at 20:41
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Nope, just math ;) –  Femaref Feb 24 '13 at 20:41
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@PremGenError It's not amazing, it's mathematics! Which... of course can be quite amazing sometimes :) –  Simon André Forsberg Feb 24 '13 at 20:42
    
@SimonAndréForsberg true... :) –  PermGenError Feb 24 '13 at 20:43
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You can use any simple commutative calculation that can be reversed:

  • addition: f(x)=7+5-x
  • xor: f(x)=7^5^x
  • multiplication: f(x)=7*5/x
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How does the xor one work? –  davegri Feb 24 '13 at 20:48
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The reverse of xor is also xor. In each example, x will cancel one of the terms, leaving the other one as the result. –  aditsu Feb 24 '13 at 20:49
    
how would the xor be written in java code? simple return 7^5^x ? –  davegri Feb 24 '13 at 20:50
    
Yes that's right. You can also replace 7^5 with its result (2). –  aditsu Feb 24 '13 at 20:51
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Beware that you can generalize the multiplication approach if and only if a and b (instead of 5 and 7) both are nonzero. –  Lumen Feb 24 '13 at 22:03
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public int f(int x) {
    return x ^ 2;
}

In binary:

7 = 111
5 = 101
2 = 010

XOR (^ in java) flips the 2 bit on if it's off and off if it's on.

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x^2 is enough :) –  aditsu Feb 24 '13 at 20:48
    
an explanation would be great! thanks –  davegri Feb 24 '13 at 20:48
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This is basically the same as my 2nd example, because 2 = 7 ^ 5 –  aditsu Feb 24 '13 at 20:50
    
@user2105338 ^ = XOR operator. Look up that and you might learn more. –  Simon André Forsberg Feb 24 '13 at 20:51
    
@aditsu, thanks. I was thinking I had to worry about the higher order bits for some reason. –  Skip Head Feb 24 '13 at 20:52
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How about:

public int q(int in)
{
    static final int[] ret = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 7, 0, 5};
    return ret[in];
}
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1  
+1 for un-regarding space complexity .. :) –  URL87 Feb 25 '13 at 9:39
    
this is a great answer! loving it –  davegri Feb 25 '13 at 11:22
    
+1 Good answer and simple. –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 25 '13 at 11:27
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If I had been the one interviewing and you solved it only for numeric input, my next question would have been, "How would you solve this problem for non-numeric input?" because I wouldn't be looking for mathematical cleverness. Instead, how about this?

List<String> options = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList("bob", "fred"));
options.remove("bob");
System.out.println(options.get(0));

That can obviously be easily adapted to any type, including Object, so long as the equality of the objects works out correctly, and as a bonus, it can be expressed much more concisely in other languages, such as Groovy:

println((["bob", "fred"] - "bob").first())

The output, in either case, is obviously "fred". If I were the one interviewing, this is the answer I'd be looking for.

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7  
I'm pretty sure remove() uses a condition, but I'm not sure if that would be considered breaking the rules or not –  davegri Feb 24 '13 at 21:20
    
At least the Groovy version is breaking the rules, since at least in all programming languages I know of, it != "bob" is a condition. –  Simon André Forsberg Feb 24 '13 at 21:36
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I like the answer, but my interpretation of "without using any conditions" does not allow usage of a method that uses conditions. –  Simon André Forsberg Feb 24 '13 at 22:05
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@user2105338: Basically, solving the problem this way shows that you can solve problems by manipulating common data structures, which is a useful thing to have in a developer. What does it show if you come up with a mathematical trick that only solves the problem for numbers? –  Ryan Stewart Feb 24 '13 at 22:06
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@Simon: "Math" isn't a Programming Paradigm. I'm talking about functional vs. imperative. The phrasing sounds exactly like that kind of question. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 24 '13 at 23:44
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public int xyz(int x) {
    return 35 / x;
}
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2  
While the accepted answer is good, I like this one more, because I would not think about it. I immediately thought about 7 MOD input + 5 :) –  Michal B. Feb 25 '13 at 10:40
1  
public int xyz(int x) { return (12- x); } –  SREEJITH Feb 25 '13 at 11:39
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How does the xor one work? [for case f(x) = 7^5^x ]

XOR (^) is Exclusive OR and works this way

a|b|a^b
-------
0|0| 0
0|1| 1
1|0| 1
1|1| 0

So XOR (^) can be used to change bits of some number. For example when we want to change last two bits of any number (like xxxx10 to xxxx01) we can do it with numbrer ^ 3 since 3 is binary 00011.

Here are few facts about XOR

  1. XOR is symmetric -> a^b = b^a
  2. XOR is associative -> (a^b)^c = a^(b^c)
  3. a^a = 0 (ones in a will be replaced with zeros and zeros will be not changed)

    example for a = 157 (binary 010011101)

      010011101
    ^ 010011101
    -----------
      000000000
    
  4. 0^a = a (ones in a can only change zeros so they will change them to ones)

      000000000
    ^ 010011101
    -----------
      010011101
    

so using facts (1) and (2) 7^5^x == x^7^5 == x^5^7

Lets try to check how x^7^5 will work for x=7.

(x^7)^5 = (7^7)^5 = 0^5 = 5

And same happens for x=5

(x^5)^7 = (5^5)^7 = 0^7 = 7
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If I may add another fact: XOR means Exclusive OR ^^ (now that's a smiley, do not be confused!) –  Adrian M Feb 25 '13 at 9:48
    
@AdrianM thanks included it in answer :) –  Pshemo Feb 25 '13 at 17:10
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