Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using this set-up to allow accessing the variable outside the jQuery plugin:

(function($){

  $.fn.myplugin = function() {
    return this.each(function() {
      // plugin code here
      console.log($.fn.myplugin.myvar);
    });
  };

  $.fn.myplugin.myvar = { ... };

})(jQuery);

I can access myvar inside and outside the plugin using $.fn.myplugin.myvar. But it's quite verbose... I feel like there must be a way to access the variable inside the plugin with a shorter name, like this.myvar. That example doesn't work as this refers to the current element. But is there another way to access the variable more simply?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$.fn is an alias to the jQuery's prototype, so I don't think there is a simpler way, unless you save that plugin in a variable.

What does jQuery.fn mean?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, after declaring the plugin function you could assign it to a variable like exports, for example, following the CommonJS convention: var exports = $.fn.myplugin; exports.myvar = ... –  Matt Browne Feb 24 '13 at 20:46
add comment

gdoron's answer is the simplest solution...another thing you could consider would be writing your plugin in an object-oriented style, e.g.

function MyPlugin(element) {
    this.element = element;
}

MyPlugin.prototype.init = function() {
    //plugin code here
}

MyPlugin.myVar = { ... };

$.fn.myplugin = function() {
    return this.each(function() {
        var instance = $(this).data('myplugin');
        if (!instance) {
            var instance = new MyPlugin(this);
            $(this).data('myplugin', instance);
        }
        instance.init.apply(instance, arguments);
    });
}

Then if you needed to access any of the instance properties or methods, you could do so via $('#someElement').data('myplugin');. You could also make the same methods available by letting the first parameter be the method name, followed by the method arguments, like how jQuery UI works...but that gets slightly more complicated to implement. If you're interested, Google "jQuery widget pattern."

share|improve this answer
    
Note that if myVar were instance specific, it should be declared within the MyPlugin constructor, e.g. this.myVar = {...} –  Matt Browne Feb 24 '13 at 20:57
add comment

I think it'd just be easier to assign the variable when you define the function (demo):

var myplugin;
(function($){

  myplugin = $.fn.myplugin = function() {
    return this.each(function() {
      // plugin code here
      console.log(myplugin.myvar);
    });
  };

  myplugin.myvar = { test: true };

})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.