Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a data frame that's got the following form

pages                         count
[page 1, page 2, page 3]      23
[page 2, page 4]              4
[page 1, page 3, page 4]      12

And what I need to do is split the first column at the commas and create enough new columns to cover the longest sequence. The result should be:

First Page      Second Page  Third Page     Count
page 1          page 2       page 3         23
page 2          page 4       null           4
page 1          page 3       page 4         12

I'm fine if the null is a zero-length string, and I can handle stripping off the brackets.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

sample data

myDat <- read.table(text=
  "pages|count
[page 1, page 2, page 3]|23
[page 2, page 4]|4
[page 1, page 3, page 4]|12", header=TRUE, sep="|") 

We can pull pages out of myDat to work on it.

# if factors, convert to characters
pages <- as.character(myDat$page)

# remove brackets.  Note the double-escape's in R
pages <- gsub("(\\[|\\])", "", pages)

# split on comma
pages <- strsplit(pages, ",")

# find the largest element
maxLen <- max(sapply(pages, length))

# fill in any blanks. The t() is to transpose the return from sapply
pages <- 
t(sapply(pages, function(x)
      # append to x, NA's.  Note that if (0 == (maxLen - length(x))), then no NA's are appended 
      c(x, rep(NA, maxLen - length(x)))
  ))

# add column names as necessary
colnames(pages) <- paste(c("First", "Second", "Third"), "Page")

# Put it all back together
data.frame(pages, Count=myDat$count)



Results

> data.frame(pages, Count=myDat$count)
  First.Page Second.Page Third.Page Count
1     page 1      page 2     page 3    23
2     page 2      page 4       <NA>     4
3     page 1      page 3     page 4    12
share|improve this answer
    
Ricardo looks that we need a pre-processing before usinf this solution, do you need to add | as separator? –  agstudy Feb 24 '13 at 22:24
    
@agstudy, no preprocessing needed. I added the | into the sample data simply to make it easier to copy and paste, but it vanishes in the same line (ie, by read.table). Since the OP didn't give a name to the data frame, I called it myDat. It should all be copy+paste'able. –  Ricardo Saporta Feb 24 '13 at 22:33
    
This is bang on. Thanks! –  TWAndrews Feb 25 '13 at 3:14

My "splitstackshape" package has a function that addresses this kind of problem. The relevant function in this case is concat.split and works as follows (using "myDat" from Ricardo's answer):

# Get rid of "[" and "]" from your "pages" variable
myDat$pages <- gsub("\\[|\\]", "", myDat$pages)
# Specify the source data.frame, the variable that needs to be split up
#   and whether to drop the original variable or not
library(splitstackshape)
concat.split(myDat, "pages", ",", drop = TRUE)
#   count pages_1 pages_2 pages_3
# 1    23  page 1  page 2  page 3
# 2     4  page 2  page 4        
# 3    12  page 1  page 3  page 4
share|improve this answer

read.table with fill=TRUE can fill them in:

# test data

Lines <- "pages                         count
[page 1, page 2, page 3]      23
[page 2, page 4]              4
[page 1, page 3, page 4]      12"

# code - replace text=Lines with something like "myfile.dat"

DF <- read.table(text = Lines, skip = 1, sep = "]", as.is = TRUE)
DF2 <- read.table(text = DF[[1]], sep = ",", fill = TRUE, as.is = TRUE)
DF2$count <- DF[[2]]

which gives this:

> DF2
       V1      V2      V3 count
1 [page 1  page 2  page 3    23
2 [page 2  page 4             4
3 [page 1  page 3  page 4    12

Now remove the the [ (you indicated this was not a necessary part of the solution) and possibly improve the column names.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.