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If I want to find something in a list in python I can use the 'in' operator:

list = ['foo', 'bar']
'foo' in list #returns True

But what should I do if I want to find something in a nested list?

list = [('foo', 'bar'), ('bar', 'foo')]
'foo' in list #returns False

Is it possible to do it in one row without a for loop for example?

Thanks!

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1  
Actually that's a nested tuple, but it doesn't matter. –  Name McChange Feb 24 '13 at 22:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You probably want any:

>>> list = [('foo', 'bar'), ('bar', 'foo')]
>>> any('foo' in e for e in list)
True

Some sort of loop is inevitable though.

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Ah perfect, thank you :) I did not know that I can connect these statemens + operators in one line. Thanks! –  Eknoes Feb 24 '13 at 22:25

You could also do this with in

>>> list = [('foo', 'bar'), ('bar', 'foo')]
>>> 'foo' in (x[1] for x in list)
True

EDIT: this method check only if foo is as fist element.

To search as 'foo' a element (any):

 >>>'foo' in reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, list)   
 True

Some more try:

In [7]: list
Out[7]: [('foo', 'me', 'bar'), ('bar', 'foo', 'you')]
In [8]: 'me' in reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, list)
Out[8]: True

In [9]: 'you' in reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, list)
Out[9]: True
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This doesn't do what you think it does. [x[1] for x in list] just searches the second element of every internal tuple, ie ['bar', 'foo']. –  chmullig Feb 25 '13 at 1:44
    
@chmullig Yes you are correct. Now updated my answer Thanks! –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 25 '13 at 7:44

If you have a list of iterables with arbitrary depth, flatten it first:

import collections 

li= [('foo', 'bar'), ('bar', 'foo'),[[('deeper',('foobar'))]]]

def flatten(l):
    for el in l:
        if isinstance(el, collections.Iterable) and not isinstance(el, basestring):
            for sub in flatten(el):
                yield sub
        else:
            yield el

print 'deeper' in flatten(li)  
print 'foo' in flatten(li) 
print 'nope' in flatten(li)

Prints:

True
True
False
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You could use itertools.chain like that :

from itertools import chain

nested__seq = [(1,2,3), (4,5,6)]

print 4 in chain(*nested__seq)

PS : you shouldn't override bultins like "list"

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It's abusive, but you can do this in one line pretty easily.

mainlist = [('foo', 'bar'), ('bar', 'foo')]
[elem for elem in sublist for sublist in mainlist] #['bar', 'bar', 'foo', 'foo']

'foo' in [elem for elem in sublist for sublist in mainlist] # True
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And this is your method Good! –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 25 '13 at 13:40

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