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Is there a way to build and install Python 2.7.x so that it has no direct dependency whatsoever on anything under /System/Library/Frameworks? (IOW, such Python should remain functional even after sudo chmod 000 /System/Library/Frameworks.)

I thought it would be enough to omit the --enable-framework flag at the time of running ./configure, but I was wrong: if I do this the resulting Python still has plenty of dependencies to frameworks under /System/Library/Frameworks, including, of course, /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework. (IOW, one has to wonder if there's any difference between installing with and without selecting --enable-framework.)

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Never, ever, actually remove anything from /System/Library/Frameworks! You could break your OS X installation. –  Ned Deily Feb 24 '13 at 22:32
    
@PavelAnossov: that's precisely what I'm trying to do, but I have not been able to install a virtualenv that does not somehow depend on stuff under /System/Library/Frameworks. –  kjo Feb 24 '13 at 22:35
    
@NedDeily: it was just a manner of speaking; I have not deleted anything from /System/Library/Frameworks. I just want to install a copy of python (and pip/virtualenv/virtualenvwrapper, etc.) that do not depend at all on what's under /System/Library/Frameworks. –  kjo Feb 24 '13 at 22:38
    
You need to be more explicit about what you are trying to do and why you think this is important. –  Ned Deily Feb 24 '13 at 22:39
    
BTW, using virtualenv is fine but does not change any dependencies on non-Python frameworks and libraries. –  Ned Deily Feb 24 '13 at 22:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, --enable-framework makes a difference when building and installing Python. Without --enable-framework, Python is built as a conventional "unix-style" build by default installed to /usr/local/ but that can be changed with the --prefix= option to ./configure. --enable-framework builds a Python that, by default, is installed into /Library/Frameworks, although that can be changed by specifying another path to --enable-framework. But any Python build will be dependent on other libraries and frameworks provided by the operating system. This is normal. Why are you concerned about it?

Update: It's easy to avoid using the Apple-supplied system Pythons, e.g. those which are in /usr/bin and whose shared components are in /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.frameworks, just by installing another Python 2.7 and not using /usr/bin/python2.7. But that doesn't mean you should or can avoid using other system frameworks.

That said, there is one known problematic Apple-supplied framework in OS X 10.6 through 10.8 that is used by Python: that is Tk 8.5, used by Python Tkinter applications including IDLE. Fortunately, it is pretty easy to work around that. Like Python, you can install a newer, third-party version of the Tcl 8.5 and Tk 8.5 frameworks into /Library/Frameworks and some Python distributions, like the binary installers from python.org, will use them. We recommend the ActiveTcl distribution if you are able to use it. See http://www.python.org/download/mac/tcltk/ for more information.

Also, be aware that you need to install separate versions of Distribute (or setuptools), pip (if you use it), and/or virtualenv for each instance of Python you have. Don't fall into the trap of using the Apple-supplied easy_install commands in /usr/bin/ which are for the system Pythons.

Further update: With the further refinement

avoid all the stuff under /S/L/F/Python.framework". I already tried something like what you describe, but the resulting installation still depends on stuff under /S/L/F/Python.framework

all I can do is reiterate that building your own Python, be it a "unix" build, a "shared" build, or a "framework" build, the resultant Python should be totally independent of anything in /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework. If not, something went wrong in the build or in how you are executing Python. More details would be needed to determine what is going wrong, at a minimum something like:

/path/to/your/python -c "import sys, pprint; print(sys.version); print(sys.executable); pprint.pprint(sys.path)"

If you built the Python, we'd need to see the complete configure and make commands. But that would be getting into localized debugging not really appropriate for StackOverflow.

Last (!) update: In a framework build, the --enable-framework=/path/to option to configure uses that "prefix" as the install "prefix" location for the framework and two auxiliary directories if you stick to using paths that end in Library/Frameworks. So, if you used:

./configure --enable-framework=/baz/quux/Library/Frameworks && make && make install

it should result in:

/baz
    quux
        Applications
            Python 2.7
                Build Applet.app
                IDLE.app
                ...
        Library
            Frameworks
                Python
                    Version
                        2.7
                            Headers/
                            Python
                            ...
                            Resources/
                            bin
                                ...
                                2to3
                                idle2.7
                                ...
                                python
                                python2
                                python2.7
                                ...
                            include/
                            lib/
                            share/
        bin
            2to3 -> ...bin/2to3
            ...
            idle2.7 -> ...bin/idle2.7
            ...
            python -> ...bin/python
            ...

The top-level bin directory is somewhat vestigial and really just confuses matters. It contains symlinks to the executables in the framework bin directory. It's what gets installed in /usr/local/bin by a default framework build. One problem with using it is that Distutils-installed scripts will, by default, get installed to the framework bin directory and there won't be an alias for them in the top-level directory. That's why it is recommended that you put the framework bin directory at the head of your shell PATH and just ignore the top-level bin.

If --prefix=/foo/bar is added to the previous configure, it will use the prefix path as the root for the vestigial top-level bin directory. In the above example, that top-level bin directory would be installed instead at:

/foo
    bar
        bin
            2to3 -> ...bin/2to3
            ...
            idle2.7 -> ...bin/idle2.7
            ...
            python -> ...bin/python
            ...

Otherwise, it should have no effect.

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My experience (and, as I discovered in a recent local Python meet-up, that of many others) is that, under OS X, it is far more difficult to control one's Python environment than it is under Ubuntu. The consensus opinion was to avoid the stuff under /S/L/F (formerly /Library/Frameworks) at all cost. –  kjo Feb 24 '13 at 22:42
    
I think you are getting confused advice. It's easy to avoid using the Apple-supplied system Pythons, e.g. those which are in /usr/bin and whose shared components are in /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.frameworks, just by installing another Python 2.7 and not using /usr/bin/python2.7. But that doesn't mean you should or can avoid using other system frameworks. –  Ned Deily Feb 24 '13 at 22:45
    
OK, I'll be more precise: "avoid all the stuff under /S/L/F/Python.framework". I already tried something like what you describe, but the resulting installation still depends on stuff under /S/L/F/Python.framework. –  kjo Feb 24 '13 at 23:08
    
As I said, that's easy. Avoid invoking any Python from /usr/bin, such as /usr/bin/python2.7 or /usr/bin/python. There are lots of ways to accomplish that. For example, modify your shell startup file to put the framework bin directory first on your PATH. The python.org binary installers for OS X have an option to do that for you. –  Ned Deily Feb 24 '13 at 23:11
    
And if you built your own Python and it is using things under /System/Library/Python.frameworks, something is wrong, most likely you are not using the Python you think you are. –  Ned Deily Feb 24 '13 at 23:13

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