Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Python inside of Autodesk Maya but this should apply anywhere.

I have a class called bRigUI and it inherits from another class called wingUtils inside of the file wingUtilities.py

I can get to the self.gPrefix / etc. names by using inheritance. But I don't know how to get to the functions inside of the function that's inside of the class such as def cName(txt):

Here is the wingUtilities script:

import maya.cmds as cmds

class wingUtils():
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def wingUtil(self, *args):
        self.gPrefix = cmds.textField(self.prefixField, q = True, text = True)
        self.lPrefix = cmds.textField(self.leftPrefixField, q = True, text = True)
        self.rPrefix = cmds.textField(self.rightPrefixField, q = True, text = True)

        def cName(txt):
            n = self.gPrefix + (txt)
        def lName(txt):
            n = self.gPrefix + self.lPrefix + (txt)
        def rName(txt):
            n = self.gPrefix + self.rPrefix + (txt)

w = wingUtils()

And here is a VERY dumbed down UI script that is trying to call it (and is also the class with the inheritance) - this script wont work, it's just a shell to show you what I'm doing without all the clutter.

import maya.cmds as cmds
import jtWingRigAutomation.wingUtilities as wingUtilities

reload(wingUtilities)

class bRigUI(wingUtilities.wingUtils):
    def __init__(self):

        bRigUI = 'bRigUI'

        if cmds.window(bRigUI, exists = True):
            cmds.deleteUI(bRigUI)

            bRigUI = cmds.window('bRigUI', title = 'JT Wing Rig Automation')
        form = cmds.formLayout()
        tabs = cmds.tabLayout(innerMarginWidth = 5, innerMarginHeight = 5)
        cmds.formLayout(form, e = True, attachForm=((tabs, 'top', 0), (tabs, 'left', 0), (tabs, 'bottom', 0), (tabs, 'right', 0)))

        tab2 = cmds.rowColumnLayout('Wing Setup', parent = tabs)
        cmds.text(self.naming(), parent = tab2)

        cmds.showWindow(bRigUI)
        cmds.window(bRigUI, e = True, w = 250, h = 500)

b = bRigUI()

What do I enter in the UI script to call to the function cName within the method within the wingUtils class?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't. cName is a local variable which only exists within the function context of wingUtils.wingUtil, and is only accessible via code within that function.

share|improve this answer
    
Which is why declaring functions inside functions is considered poor form amongst all python programmers I know. Better to declare them in the class, possibly with a preceding _ if you want to indicate they're intended for private use. eg def _rName(self, txt): –  chmullig Feb 25 '13 at 1:25
    
@chmullig unless you want to create a decorator, or otherwise return a function object. But in this case it really just looks like a indentation error. –  joojaa Feb 25 '13 at 13:06
add comment

The only way would be to move the inner functions to the outer scope. Do you have a good reason for them to be function-internal? If so, there's no way to do what you want. Otherwise you may consider rewriting that class. Currently the three functions cName(), lName() and rName() do absolutely nothing, because no code can call them from outside, and they're not being called inside. In this case it's as easy as unindenting them, and adding self:

class wingUtils():
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def wingUtil(self, *args):
        self.gPrefix = cmds.textField(self.prefixField, q = True, text = True)
        self.lPrefix = cmds.textField(self.leftPrefixField, q = True, text = True)
        self.rPrefix = cmds.textField(self.rightPrefixField, q = True, text = True)

    def cName(self, txt):
        n = self.gPrefix + (txt)
    def lName(self, txt):
        n = self.gPrefix + self.lPrefix + (txt)
    def rName(self, txt):
        n = self.gPrefix + self.rPrefix + (txt)
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if I can set two answers to be correct! But you're right, as is the other guy, I should have simply just moved them outside, I thought I'd be able to get at them but now I know :) –  user1090427 Feb 25 '13 at 1:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.