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RSVP.js (which implements the Promises/A+ spec) swallows exceptions in the callback. That's by design (#46).

This means that assertion errors are swallowed too. Here is an example with Mocha:

it 'does something asynchronous', (done) ->
  getSomePromise().then (value) =>
    # When this assertion fails, it gets swallowed, and Mocha times out.
    value.should.equal 'foo'
    done()
  , (err) =>
    done(err)

Is there a nice way to handle this?

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make a function which takes in it and returns a function that you call instead of it that does all this automatically. Your test function will need to start with return getSomePromise() –  Andy Ray Feb 25 '13 at 1:43
    
"When this assertion fails, it gets swallowed". To clarify, the exception that value.should.equal throws gets caught by the function calling the "success" callback. This is a feature of Promises/A+ to ensure that you can always handle any errors (exceptions or otherwise) in the "failure" callback at the end of the promise chain. –  Meryn Stol Apr 11 '13 at 13:59
1  
Note: The newest version of Mocha supports promises directly. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 17 '14 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Figured it out:

Chain a second .then to handle any error. Move the done() call into the second .then as well.

it 'does something asynchronous', (done) ->
  getSomePromise().then (value) =>
    value.should.equal 'foo'
  .then => # calling .then for the second time!
    done()
  , (err) =>
    # This will handle any errors from the original `getSomePromise()` call,
    # and any assertion errors from the first `.then` callback.
    done(err)

Or as a one-liner .then:

it 'does something asynchronous', (done) ->
  getSomePromise().then (value) =>
    value.should.equal 'foo'
  .then (=> done()), done

As Forbes helpfully pointed out, there are libraries like mocha-as-promised, which allow you to return a promise from your test function, so that you do not have to call done() yourself:

it 'does something asynchronous', ->
  return getSomePromise().then (value) =>
    value.should.equal 'foo'
share|improve this answer
    
nice and simple solution. also, since done() accepts an error, you can just call .then(done, done). –  rubiii Nov 18 '13 at 13:21
3  
@rubiii that will fail if your promise is for something other than undefined. You need to make sure done is called with undefined as the first argument (or no arguments). –  ForbesLindesay Nov 19 '13 at 13:25
    
@ForbesLindesay stupid me. thanks for noticing it. –  rubiii Nov 20 '13 at 9:42
1  
rubii's half right - you can still pass done as the fail handler, instead of having (err) => done(err). So the one-liner could be .then (=> done()), done) –  Nick Dec 5 '13 at 11:14
    
Thanks Nick, I've updated the one-liner in my answer. –  Jo Liss Dec 5 '13 at 17:42

Then 'returns' a promise which can be used to handle the error. Most libraries support a method called done which will make sure any un-handled errors are thrown.

it('does something asynchronous', function (done) {
  getSomePromise()
    .then(function (value) {
      value.should.equal('foo')
    })
    .done(() => done(), done);
});

You can also use something like mocha-as-promised (there are similar libraries for other test frameworks). If you're running server side:

npm install mocha-as-promised

Then at the start of your script:

require("mocha-as-promised")();

If you're running client side:

<script src="mocha-as-promised.js"></script>

Then inside your tests you can just return the promise:

it('does something asynchronous', function () {
  return getSomePromise()
    .then(function (value) {
      value.should.equal('foo')
    });
});

Or in coffee-script (as per your original example)

it 'does something asynchronous', () ->
  getSomePromise().then (value) =>
    value.should.equal 'foo'
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