Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want implement the strategy pattern in C++ but I have a doubt. Alwyas the strategy patterns examples are than follow code (in C#). I want modify the client, i.e MainClass, such that choose the concrete strategy will be dynamic way. For example, passing the strategy name by the args[] parameters of the main method. How I will be able to implement this without modify the properties of this pattern?.

namespace StrategyPatterns
{ 
  // Interface definition for a Sort algorithm
  public interface ISort
  {
  void Sort(List<string> list)
  }

  // QuickSort implementation
  public class CQuickSorter : ISort
  {
    void Sort(List<string> list)
    {
      // Here will come the actual imp
    }
  }

   // BubbleSort
  public class CBubbleSort : ISort
  {
    void Sort(List<string> list)
    {
      // The actual imp of the sort
    }
  }

  public class Context
  {
   private ISort sorter;

   public Context(ISort sorter)
   {
     // We pass the context the strategy to use
     this.sorter = sorter;
   }

public ISort Sorter
 {
  get{return sorter;)
 }
}

public class MainClass
{
    static void Main()
     {
       List<string> myList = new List<string>();

       myList.Add("Hello world");
       myList.Add("Another item");

       Contexto cn = new Contexto(new CQuickSorter());
       cn.Sorter.Sort(myList);
       cn = new Contexto(new CBubbleSort());
       cn.Sorter.Sort(myList);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
which language is this supposed to be? atleast 1 typo and several syntax errors.. Looks more like C#? –  Karthik T Feb 25 '13 at 2:08
    
As @KarthikT answers, you can't do that directly from a string in C++, his answer is one method. "Dependency Injection" is probably a good search term to see frameworks for doing this sort of thing in all sorts of ways (including some that are dynamic.) –  Chris Hartman Feb 25 '13 at 2:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

We do not have reflection in C++, that is the concept you need to get this to work right.. The alternative that I can think of, is to make a factory method as below..

ISort* CreateSorter(SortType type)
{
    switch (type){
    case QUICK_SORT: return new CQuickSorter();
    ...
    }
}

I use an enum for cleaner code, but you can change that into a string, as long as you are able to understand my basic point.

share|improve this answer
    
Hopefully reflection makes it into C++14: root.cern.ch/drupal/content/c14 –  Carl Feb 25 '13 at 2:14
    
@carleeto That's the first time I've seen it, but I think with a statement like The next two standards are planned for 2014 and 2017, with 2014 being a bit like 2003: mostly bug fixes and usability improvements. reflection would be coming in C++17. –  ta.speot.is Feb 25 '13 at 2:25

I would give the context class a templated factory function setSorter and handle the entire lifetime of the sorter objects internally.

class Interface {  //this class and all sorting clases could be templated to be able to deal with sorting lists of different data types
    std::unique_ptr<ISort> sorter_;
public:
    Interface():sorter_(new CQuickSorter()){ //CQuickSorter is the default sorter
    }
    template<typename T>
    setSorter(){    //one could also use perfect forwarding to pass arguments to T's constructor
        sorter_.reset(new T());
    }
    void sort(std::list<string> &list){
        sorter_->sort(list); 
    }
};

int main(){
    std::list<int> li;
    Interface cn;
    cn.sort(li);  //using a default sort
    cn.setSorter<CBubbleSort>();
    cn.sort(li);  //using bubble sort
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.