Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to make a function object which takes arbitrary function objects and returns a tuple which stores the return value of each function object.

To achieve this goal, I made a class A

class A
{
private:
    template <class Ret, class Func>
    auto impl(Ret ret, Func func) -> decltype(tuple_cat(ret, make_tuple(func())))
    {
        return tuple_cat(ret, make_tuple(func()));
    }

    template <class Ret, class First, class... Funcs>
    auto impl(Ret ret, First first, Funcs... funcs) 
    -> decltype(impl(tuple_cat(ret, make_tuple(first())), funcs...))
    {
    return impl(tuple_cat(ret, make_tuple(first())), funcs...);
    }

public:
    template <class Func>
    auto operator()(Func func) -> decltype(make_tuple(func()))
        {
        return make_tuple(func());
    }

    template <class First, class... Funcs>
    auto operator()(First first, Funcs... funcs)
     -> decltype(impl(make_tuple(first()),funcs...))
    {
        impl(make_tuple(first()),funcs...);
    }
};

And in the main function, I made three lambdas.

int main(){
    auto func1 = [](){ cout << 1 << endl; return 1;};
    auto func2 = [](){ cout << 2 << endl; return 2;};
    auto func3 = [](){ cout << 3 << endl; return 3;};

    A a;
    auto x = a(func1, func2);
    cout << "ans : " << get<0>(x) << get<1>(x) << endl; // I expect ans : 12
}

This code can be compiled by gcc 4.7.2. However, it doesn't work as I expected. How should I modify this code?

share|improve this question
1  
"However, it doesn't work as I expected." So how does it work? –  Matt Ball Feb 25 '13 at 2:38
    
I got some trash values. In my computer, I got -2 1962460021 –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 2:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that you're missing a return statement:

template <class First, class... Funcs>
auto operator()(First first, Funcs... funcs)
 -> decltype(impl(make_tuple(first()),funcs...))
{
    return impl(make_tuple(first()),funcs...);
//  ^^^^^^
}

Without it, your code has Undefined Behavior. Per Paragraph 6.6.3/2 of the C++11 Standard:

[...] Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Now it works. :) –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 2:41
    
@Sungmin: Glad it helped :-) –  Andy Prowl Feb 25 '13 at 2:42

The obvious problem is that you've a missing return statement as pointed out by other answer.

Anyway, I think you have done too much. This should work:

class A
{
public:
    template <class First, class... Funcs>
    auto operator()(First first, Funcs... funcs) -> decltype((make_tuple(first(),funcs()...)))
    {
        return (make_tuple(first(),funcs()...));
    }
};

int main(){
    auto func1 = [](){ cout << 1 << endl; return 1;};
    auto func2 = [](){ cout << 2 << endl; return 2;};

    A a;
    auto x = a(func1, func2);
    cout << "ans : " << get<0>(x) << get<1>(x) << endl; // I expect ans : 12
}

Online Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. I've just seen your code. It is almost the same as mfontanini's. So, I want to ask the same question above. Could you give me some reference regarding the line make_tuple(first(),funcs()...)? –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 3:23
    
@Sungmin: Here is online doc for std::make_tuple. Have a look at it, and understand the usage! –  Nawaz Feb 25 '13 at 4:35

@Andy's fix works, but you can do it a lot simpler than that, without implementing overloads nor helper functions:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

template<typename... Args>
auto tuple_from_funs(Args&&... args) -> std::tuple<decltype(args())...>{
    return std::make_tuple(args()...);
}

int f() { return 1; }
char g() { return '2'; }
std::string h() { return "jorge"; }

int main() {
    auto tup = tuple_from_funs(f, g, h);
    std::cout << std::get<0>(tup) << ", " << std::get<1>(tup) << ", " << std::get<2>(tup) << std::endl;
}

Demo here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. However, I do not understand exactly. How is it work? could you give me some reference regarding the line std::make_tuple(args()...)? –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 3:21
    
std::make_tuple is just a function that takes some variadic template arguments and returns a tuple holding all of them. As for the args()..., it basically means "apply the call operator on each of the arguments in this parameter pack, and expand it". It's the same as doing arg0(), arg1(), arg..... –  mfontanini Feb 25 '13 at 3:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.