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I'm trying to stripe the colours of alternating elements. But I want the row colors to alternate only the visible rows. If you have a look at the below here is my attempt at trying to get it working.

http://jsfiddle.net/kuwFp/3/

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<style> 
p:not(.hide):nth-child(odd)
{
background:#ff0000;
}
p:not(.hide):nth-child(even)
{
background:#0000ff;
}
.hide { display:none; }
</style>
</head>
<body>

<p>The first paragraph.</p>
<p class="hide">The second paragraph.</p>
<p>The third paragraph.</p> 

</body>
</html>
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You cannot do this with CSS. You'll have to resort to JavaScript. –  Joseph Silber Feb 25 '13 at 3:06
    
It's possible if you can change the element type for hidden text, to let's say ..span –  onetrickpony Feb 25 '13 at 3:13
    
@one I tried taking a leaf from your book and tried this but it didn't work - jsfiddle.net/kuwFp/15 –  vdh_ant Feb 25 '13 at 4:16
    
No, I meant like this. nth-of-type will count elements of the same type only... –  onetrickpony Feb 25 '13 at 11:16
    
@OneTrickPony Problem with this is in my case they all start off as divs and I would need to change them to spans on hide. This isn't a straight forward dom change. –  vdh_ant Feb 25 '13 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

You can't do this with pure CSS because the :nth-child selector is calculated with respect to the element and :not does not filter element position in the DOM. You need to use JavaScript for a fully flexible solution.

It's still possible for you to do this inflexibly by making elements after .hide with :nth-child alternate the color they should be:

.hide + p:nth-child(odd) {
    background: #0000ff;    
}

You can continue to add similar rules for more and more combinations of sibling .hide and p, but this is very inflexible.

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