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My code works, but it's not printing right. This is my input:

Please enter in 1 for characters, 2 for ints, 3 for floats and 4 for words

1 abcdefghijklmnop 3 123.4 45.54 6.0 7890.09876 2 123 34 23 12345 4 aaaaa bbbbb ccccc sssssssssssssssssss

I don't know how to make it stop after the cccccc like it's supposed to. I have to type random stuff to fill up the space before it'll go through. I'm pretty sure that has something to do with not using malloc.

Then this is the output:

Type 1: abcdefghijklmnop Type 3: 123.400002/ 45.540001/ 6.000000/ 7890.098633 Type 2: 123, 34, 23, 12345 Type 4: ccccc ccccc ccccc Type 1: ssssssssssssssss

On type 4, it's supposed to go aaaaa bbbbb ccccc but it does that instead. And also on type 1, it doesn't show, but it prints like this weird square glitch looking thing.

Here is my code. It's in 3 files

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "lab5.h"
#include "lab5dispatch.c"
#define MAX_ENTRIES 16

int main()
{
MESSAGE cache[MAX_ENTRIES];
int i = 0;
printf("Please enter in 1 for characters, 2 for ints, 3 for floats and 4 for words\n");


while (scanf("%d", &cache[i].messageType) != EOF && i < MAX_ENTRIES) 
{
   switch(cache[i].messageType)
    {
    case 1:
        scanf("%16s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.charPointer);
        break;
    case 2:
        scanf("%d", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[0]);
        scanf("%d", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[1]);
        scanf("%d", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[2]);
        scanf("%d", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[3]);
        break;
    case 3:
        scanf("%f",  &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[0]);
        scanf("%f",  &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[1]);
        scanf("%f",  &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[2]);
        scanf("%f",  &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[3]);
        break;
    case 4:
        scanf("%s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word1);
        scanf("%s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word2);
        scanf("%s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word3);
        break;
    }
    i++;
}
message_dispatcher(cache, i);
}

This is the 2nd file.

#ifndef LAB5_H_ /* to prevent re-definitions */
#define LAB5_H_ /* that cause errors */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

//the unsigned short is to store what type of data the main struct will store

typedef struct MESSAGE
{
unsigned short int messageType;
union
{
    char * charPointer; //this is for the string
    int theInts[4];
    float theFloats[4];
    char word1[5]; //can probably use a 2d array here but that's too complicated right now haha
    char word2[5];
    char word3[5];
} MESSAGE_CONTENT;
} MESSAGE;

And this is the last file.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "lab5.h"
void message_dispatcher( MESSAGE msg[], int j ) {
int i;
for (i = 0; i < j; i++)
{
    switch(msg[i].messageType)
    {
    case 1:
        printf("Type 1: %s\n", &msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.charPointer);
        break;

    case 2:
        printf("Type 2: %d, %d, %d, %d\n", msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[0],
                msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[1], msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[2],
                msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theInts[3]);
        break;

    case 3:
        printf("Type 3: %f/ %f/ %f/ %f \n", msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[0], msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[1], msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[2], msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.theFloats[3]);
        break;

    case 4:
        printf("Type 4: %s %s %s\n", msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word1, msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word2, msg[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word3);
        break;
    }
}
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because word1, word2, and word3 are all in the same union MESSAGE_CONTENT, they're getting stored in the same memory. So each time you read into one of them, all of them will look like they got overwritten by the last value you read.

Take a look at http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/union

You should try using "char word[3][6];" in the union. That way you can store all three words. You also need to make sure each word has room for the NULL character. You wouldn't have normally been able to get away with that, but there was more room in the union.

Either of these will get you closer to what you want, (other bugs in your code not withstanding, of course):

Alternative #1

typedef struct MESSAGE
{
    unsigned short int messageType;
    union
    {
        char * charPointer;
        int theInts[4];
        float theFloats[4];
        char theWords[3][6];
    } MESSAGE_CONTENT;
} MESSAGE;

Alternative #2

typedef struct MESSAGE
{
    unsigned short int messageType;
    union
    {
        char * charPointer;
        int theInts[4];
        float theFloats[4];
        struct {
            char word1[6];
            char word2[6];
            char word3[6];
        } WORDS;
    } MESSAGE_CONTENT;
} MESSAGE;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 The fact that the OP split out the individual rows of the word arrays within the union is ultimately the issue. They need to be a single decl, otherwise they will individually take part in the union overlap, which is obviously not desired. Alternatively, he can put them in their own struct within the union if he wants to keep them separate decls. –  WhozCraig Feb 25 '13 at 3:48
    
Right, that's what I was trying to get at. –  Dave Johnson Feb 25 '13 at 3:50
    
Oooooh, ok. When you say OP, do you mean that weird glitch thing that shows on the output of Type 1: abcdefghijklmnop? (It won't copy and paste into here) –  Hokerie Feb 25 '13 at 3:57
    
@Hokerie It means Original Poster (that'd be you). Regarding the declarations, either of the above would work, just tailor to what you need. Odds are there are other issues, but this should help you get closer and answer at least this question. Hopefully it is clear why this is needed (the layout as presented here). –  WhozCraig Feb 25 '13 at 3:57
    
That worked!!! Thank you so much!!!! –  Hokerie Feb 25 '13 at 4:12

You get the wrong(not as you expect) input because of the following part of you code:

case 4:
        scanf("%s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word1);
        scanf("%s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word2);
        scanf("%s", &cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word3);
        break;

According to the scanf function syntax it`s parameters are:
1. paremeter string;
2. address of object.

Pay attention to the 2nd (address of object)
as cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word == char word1[5] == const pointer on an array, which is already an address, so in our code you should ommit &,

case 4:
            scanf("%s", cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word1);
            scanf("%s", cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word2);
            scanf("%s", cache[i].MESSAGE_CONTENT.word3);
            break;
share|improve this answer
    
I tried it both ways and they both seem to work... is that supposed to happen? –  Hokerie Feb 25 '13 at 4:22
    
@Hokerie Yes, In C the base address of an array is the array. Were it a pointer it would be wrong, but in this case both will work (though the later is better form, imho). –  WhozCraig Feb 25 '13 at 4:45

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