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so I've been working on a project that receives data from server, for example sessionKey. I created getter and setter method like this :

public class sEngine
{
private static String sessionKey;

public static String getSessionKey() {
        return sessionKey;
    }

    public static void setSessionKey(
            String sessionKey) {
        sEngine.sessionKey = sessionKey;
    }
}

Then I have activity A. In this activity A, I insert a value into the setter method.

public class A extends Activity
{
@Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

sEngine.setSessionKey("Hello world")
}
}

I also have activity B. In this activity B, I call the getter method

public class B extends Activity
{
    @Override
        protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

            String sessionKey = sEngine.getSessionKey();
    }
}

It occurs to me, that Android sometimes wipes all the data in order to free some memory, for example when I let the program idle for too long, or I used Advanced Task Killer. The problem is if those happen, I will get null in activity B when I call the getter method although I've set the value in activity A. Is there any way for me to maintain the value stored via the setter method (other than using SharedPreference) so the value will still be there although Android wipes the memories/data?

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1  
Why wouldn't you want to use SharedPreferences? It's easy to use, safe from this issue and it's a commonly accepted approach. –  A--C Feb 25 '13 at 4:29
    
Make your sEngine as singleton. Hope it may help you. –  Soumyadip Das Feb 25 '13 at 4:33
    
You can also save the data in the Bundle –  Pragnani Feb 25 '13 at 4:35
    
Why not use persistent storage? SharedPrefs or SQLite database are the most common for this type of thing. –  Jade Byfield Feb 25 '13 at 4:35
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is there any way for me to maintain the value stored via the setter method (other than using SharedPreference) so the value will still be there although Android wipes the memories/data?

Not sure why you wouldn't want to use SharedPreferences, despite it being the perfect candidate in your requirement. When somethings as simple as this can store it:

SharedPreferences sharedPrefs = getApplicationContext().getSharedPreferences(SOME_KEY, Context.MODE_PRIVATE);
Editor editor = sharedPrefs.edit();
editor.putString("session_key", sessionKey );

This will ensure your sessionkey always remains stored for easy retrieval. Unless the user clears your app data that is.

Your only alternatives as opposed to SharedPreferences are saving the sessionkey to a Database which in my opinion, considering the task it will perform, is absolutely unnecessary.

You could also consider writing the sessionkey to a text file and then read it to retrive the data.

Both the alternatives to SharedPreferences are truly unfit for the purpose you need it for. And I would really urge you to re-consider using SharedPreferences .

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2  
+1. Persistent storage is the safest way if you want to prevent data loss as much as possible. Yes the user can clear your app data, but they can just as easily FC the app, wiping the static String. You could also do cloud storage ;) –  A--C Feb 25 '13 at 4:45
    
@A--C: That is what I find interesting about the OP not wanting to use such a useful feature. –  Siddharth Lele Feb 25 '13 at 4:47
    
@SiddhartLele Yeah, my bad. Actually SharedPreferences comes to mind, but I thought it was a bad approach to save each variable using SharedPreferences, because I still have around 12 variables stored with getter setter method like this. So I was looking for another simpler and better approach. Thanks for the answer! –  Wandy Wijayanto Feb 25 '13 at 5:55
1  
@WandyWijayanto: I store and retrieve 10 variables for Facebook and Twitter session details and have never seen a slow down because of that, nor has one been reported. If that was your concern, then rest assured. It is fast. And I'm glad I could help. :-) –  Siddharth Lele Feb 25 '13 at 6:02
    
@SiddhartLele Yes, that is one of my concern. The second is, if I call from SharedPreferences, I will need Context and that means I have to change a lot of my code, meanwhile I was limited by time. Editing it will consume time, which there are so many. CMIIW, because maybe I am just having a bad structure of program. –  Wandy Wijayanto Feb 25 '13 at 6:22
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Try this, Declare you non activity class in A Activity. and then set your session value.

sEngine mengine = new sEngine();
mengine.setSessionKey("Hello world");

And also get session value in B activity.

sEngine mengine = new sEngine();
String str = mengine.getSessionKey();
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You're making new instances. If the String is still static this would have the same issue. If the String isn't static, you'd be making two separate Objects each with a different sessionKey. A singleton approach might work, but it will also most likely be killed off on low memory situations and when it is recreated, the String will be null again. –  A--C Feb 25 '13 at 4:39
    
dont use static value. public String sessionKey is enough –  MuraliGanesan Feb 25 '13 at 4:41
3  
And how do you expect two separate Instances to have the same sessionKey? From my comment: If the String isn't static, you'd be making two separate Objects each with a different sessionKey. –  A--C Feb 25 '13 at 4:42
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change

sEngine.sessionKey = sessionKey;

in your code to

this.sessionKey = sessionKey;

or simply

sessionKey = sessionKey;

using sEngine. makes one believe that your class is static.Which it isnt!

or if you want to use this sEngine. everywhere in your code you need to declare this class as static.In that case you just need to make the class declaration to static:

public static class sEngine {
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public static class sEngine please read up on what a static class actually is. You do not have to declare a class as static (and actually can't for a top level class) to allow use of static members. Doing sEngine.sessionKey is perfectly valid because the class member is static, and so, ClassName.memberName is alright and doesn't mean that the class is static. –  A--C Feb 25 '13 at 4:57
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