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When i compiles a program with this code:

int main()
{
  float a;

  scanf("%f", &a);

  printf("%.1f\n", a); //Here

  return 0;
}

There is no difference with this other:

int main()
{
  float a;

  scanf("%f", &a);

  printf("%.01f\n", a); //Here

  return 0;
}

Anybody can tell me why?

share|improve this question
    
I'd start with the specifics of the format string and particularly the section on float-formatting, precision, and alignment at this link. – WhozCraig Feb 25 '13 at 4:49
    
Thank you so much i'll be reading the information you gave me. – Christian Cisneros Feb 25 '13 at 6:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The number behind the period is the precision that specifies the number of digits after the decimal point of a floating-point value. The leading zero has no meanings.

The number before the period is the number that specifies the minimum field width. The leading zero will change the padding character from white space to 0.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your answer. – Christian Cisneros Feb 25 '13 at 6:07

The digits after the decimal point specify the precision - the minimum number of digits which will be written. .1 and .01 both say to put at least 1 digit, and to pad the result with zeros if there is fewer than 1 digit. Plain %f is equivalent to %.6f, i.e. 6 digits after the decimal point.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. – Christian Cisneros Feb 25 '13 at 6:08

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