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motivated by my previous question : Make variadic function which takes arbitary functors and returns a tuple of each return value of input functors

Now, I want to make a class which just execute each function object which may return void. To the best of my knowledge, I can make something like,

class A
{
public:
    template <class Func>
    void operator()(Func func)
    {
        func();
    }

    template <class First, class... Funcs>
    void operator()(First first, Funcs... funcs)
    {
        first();
        operator()(funcs...);
    }
};

This code does the job. However, I guess there must be much more clever way like the codes by Nawaz and mfontanini in the above link.

I tried below imitating their code.

class A
{
public:
    template <class... Func>
    void operator()(Func func...)
    {
        func()...;
    }
};

However, gcc 4.7.2 doesn't compile. Am I missing here?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this:

template <class... Func>
void operator()(Func ... func) //corrected the syntax here
{
    sink( (func(),0)... );
}

where sink is defined as:

template<typename ...T> void sink(T...) {}

The purpose of sink is to eat the value of the expression (func(),0) which is just 0 irrespective of what func() returns. It will work even if func() return type is void.

Notice the in the demo above first two functions return something but the third one returns void.

If you want the functions to be called from left-to-right, then you can use list-initialization syntax:

 int sink[]{func(),0)... };

But it unnecessarily creates a variable. So I would define sink as struct:

struct sink
{
     template<typename ...T> 
     sink(T...) {}  //templated constructor!
};

With this you can do this:

sink { (func(),0)... }; //note the curly-braces now!

Updated demo:

Hope that helps.

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It is really cool. Very clever way. :) Thanks a lot. –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 7:46
    
@Sungmin: Posted a demo also! –  Nawaz Feb 25 '13 at 7:47
    
The sink has a problem, as I explain in my answer and as can be seen from the live example: the functions don't execute in the given order. –  Xeo Feb 25 '13 at 7:51
    
@Xeo: Fixed those issues. –  Nawaz Feb 25 '13 at 7:55
    
@Xeo: It is int in this case, which is not a big deal. –  Nawaz Feb 25 '13 at 7:59
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To expand on Nawaz' answer, you need a certain context to perform pack expansion - it can't just be done anywhere. One of those contexts is function arguments, another would be any kind if initialization.

The sink function that Nawaz gave is a good starting point, but it has a serious deficiency - you don't have a guaranteed order in which the functors execute. If you want your users to be able to rely on the order they pass to you, you need a context that ensures left-to-right evaluation. Array initialization and list-initialization both fit here.

Using array initialization:

template <class... Func>
void operator()(Func func...)
{
    int ignored[] = { (func(),0)... };
    (void)ignored; // silence unused variable warnings
}

Using list-initialization:

struct swallow{
  template<class... Ignored>
  swallow(Ignored&&...)
};

template <class... Func>
void operator()(Func func...)
{
    swallow{ (func(),0)... }; // create a temporary 'swallow' from all arguments
}

The (func(), 0) part just executes func, discards the return value, if any, and then evaluates to 0.

Usually, if you want to do this for any functor, regardless of return type, and just throw away the results, you'd write it as (void(func()), 0).... The void(...) part swallows whatever return value comes from func(), if anything. This is needed because a user is allowed to overload operator,, and might decide to do so for his own type and int (the type of literal 0), which would undermine your efforts. However, you can't overload operator, with void on any side.

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Thank you for pointing our this issue. I love your solution. However, I have a question regarding the way using array initialization. Every time I call the function, I see array is constructed and destructed. Isn't the overhead quite big compared to the way using list-initialization? –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 8:21
    
@Sungmin: Since the array is unused, it's highly likely to be completely optimized away. And even then, blasting away 40 or what bytes for 10 functors isn't much. The same goes for the references / values of swallow's constructor, btw. –  Xeo Feb 25 '13 at 8:23
    
I see. I understand now. Thanks a lot.:) –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 8:27
    
@Sungmin, initialization_list also uses array under the hood, you just don't see it. –  ixSci Feb 25 '13 at 8:40
    
@ixSci: So you mean that the initialize-list has the same overhead? –  Sungmin Feb 25 '13 at 8:43
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