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I would like to know whether this two versions are equivalent in result and which is better for performance reasons and why? Nested Select in Select version

select 
 t1.c1, 
 t1.c2, 
 (select Count(t2.c1) from t2 where t2.id = t1.id) as count_t 
from 
 t1 

VS

select t1.c1,t1.c2, Count(t2.c1)
from t1,t2
where t2.id= t1.id
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first query is analog of this query -

SELECT
  t1.c1,
  t1.c2,
  COUNT(t2.c1)
FROM t1
  LEFT JOIN t2
    ON t2.id = t1.id;

It selects all records from first table, and all matched records from second table (it is LEFT JOIN condition).

The second is analog of this query -

SELECT
  t1.c1,
  t1.c2,
  COUNT(t2.c1)
FROM t1
  JOIN t2
    ON t2.id = t1.id;

It selects only matched records in both tables (it is INNER JOIN condition).

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"The first query is analog of this query ..." Yes, but only of t2(id) is the primary key or unique. –  ypercube Feb 25 '13 at 9:17
    
@Devart: Just to clarify something, my first query count(t2.c1) if there is matching between t1.id and t2.id while in your suggetion this will work if and only if Count function doesn't count nulls , am I right? –  JavaSa Feb 25 '13 at 10:19

Well they are different queries. The top one will select all rows from t1 returning 0 for the count if there is no matching id in table t2.

The second query will only return rows where t1 and t2 both have a row with the same id.

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The first query will likely suffer from performance issues on large data sets. The second query will potentially have a Cartesian issue. I would go with a join or left join based on your intent to have records from table 1 if table 2 has no related records and then add a group by statement to control the Cartesian.

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