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Needs -

  1. To declare shared exports of the same interface. The exports are marked by unique export names so consumers may import a particular flavor of the export.
  2. To inject a common instance of the class into a set of objects but to not share a common instance across sets of objects [This makes me use shared exports using different keys - one set of objects can use a single key to get satisfy their shared import need]

Here is the export class

public interface IMyExport
{
    void Display();
}

public class MyExport : IMyExport
{
    private Guid _id = Guid.NewGuid();

    public void Display()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Instance ID = "+_id);
    }
}

and here is how I export instances of the class

public static class ExportInitialization
{
    [Export("Type A", typeof(IMyExport)),
    Export("Type B", typeof(IMyExport))]
    public static IMyExport IceCreamExport
    {
        get
        {
            return new MyExport();
        }
    }
}

Consumers may import specific instances in the following manner

[Export]
public class ImporterA
{
    private readonly IMyExport _myExport;

    [ImportingConstructor]
    public ImporterA([Import("Type A")]IMyExport myExport)
    {
        _myExport = myExport;
    }

    public void Display()
    {
        _myExport.Display();
    }
}

[Export]
public class ImporterB
{
    private readonly IMyExport _myExport;

    [ImportingConstructor]
    public ImporterB([Import("Type B")]IMyExport myExport)
    {
        _myExport = myExport;
    }

    public void Display()
    {
        _myExport.Display();
    }
}

class Program
{
    [Import]
    public ImporterA ImporterA { get; set; }

    [Import]
    public ImporterB ImporterB { get; set; }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        new Program().Run();
    }

    public void Run()
    {
        var container = new CompositionContainer(new AssemblyCatalog(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()));
        container.ComposeParts(this);

        ImporterA.Display();
        ImporterB.Display();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

This used to work fine with .Net 4.0 but when .Net 4.5 is installed - I get the following ouptut

Instance ID = 78bba41a-0c48-44fc-ae69-f0ead96371f9
Instance ID = 78bba41a-0c48-44fc-ae69-f0ead96371f9

Notice that the same instance of the object is returned for both imports. Am I breaking some undocumented rule regarding exporting via static properties?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean, "this used to work fine"? Was your goal to have distinct instances of the MyExport class? –  Jean Hominal Feb 25 '13 at 9:35
    
Correct - I have just added code snippets to indicate that –  sreyas Feb 25 '13 at 9:36
    
@sreyas This is indeed weird. I can't try it at the moment though. Anyway, why don't you use the static properties directly instead of using MEF for something like that? It is more straight-forward. –  Panos Rontogiannis Feb 25 '13 at 17:39
    
@PanosRontogiannis - 2 reasons : 1. The importer is part of a framework and the "client" injects this value - so can't use static properties. 2. There are a set of classes which require the same instance to be shared but each set requires its unique instance –  sreyas Feb 25 '13 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

This is related to the MEF parts lifetime.

The default for MEF attributes is that components do not say whether they care to get a new instance each time or not.

Meaning that:

  • Your ExportAttribute does not specify whether exported instances can or should be shared;
  • Both of the ImportAttributes do not specify whether their import should be shared or not;

The default behavior of MEF is that, if it is not forbidden from sharing instances, it will. Meaning that, according to the documentation, the behavior of .NET 4.5 is the correct one: the instance of MyExport is shared, given that no-one on either side explicitly forbade sharing.

I think that .NET 4.0 had a bug/discrepancy where the static property was called every time, which resulted in what you observed, that is, non shared instances. And you were relying on that bug. I think that the bug finds its origin in a fundamental, framework-wide expectation for properties - it is very unusual to have a static property create a new, semantically distinct, instance for each property call.

I believe you should:

  1. Replace your static property export with a static method export;
  2. Specify the creation policy to non-shared, on either the Export side or the Import side;
share|improve this answer
    
My understanding was that MEF uses a combination of the export type name + export string name(if provided) to distinguish between exports. In the above example I declared 2 exports both with distinct keys, though the type was the same. When importing I am explicitly specifying the key (string) I am interested in - so MEF should have created 2 shared instances (Type A and Type B) rather than 1. –  sreyas Feb 25 '13 at 9:55
    
The fact that an "export name" consists of a "type+contract name" is only relevant for resolving an import. But if MEF can tell that a given part is exported under two names, then it is in my opinion perfectly allowed to have the shared parts of these two exports be the same, as the importers and exporters already specified that they do not mind sharing their instances. –  Jean Hominal Feb 25 '13 at 11:15
    
My usage is such that I need to share the same export within a set of consumers but have separate instances across different sets of consumers. Keying by type+contract name facilitates this. –  sreyas Feb 25 '13 at 14:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found that exporting the specific instances from two distinct static properties ensures that 2 distinct instances are returned.

    [Export("Type A", typeof(IMyExport))]
    public static IMyExport ExportA
    {
        get
        {
            return new MyExport();
        }
    }

    [Export("Type B", typeof(IMyExport))]
    public static IMyExport ExportB
    {
        get
        {
            return new MyExport();
        }
    }

This is puzzling since in the unmodified version the static getter was creating a new instance on every get. Not sure if this is the result of some C#/.Net optimization introduced with 4.5 or if this is a MEF issue

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