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Since Thawte (and several other CA's) transitioned from 1024-bit roots to new, more secure 2048-bit roots, there have been complications in the verification of certain SSL certificates such as the Thawte wildcard certificate since it contains the "thawte Primary Root CA" in its certificate chain.

This has resulted in certain browsers not being able to verify the certificate when installed in Windows. The manual resolution can be found at http://www.tbs-certificats.com/FAQ/en/608.html.

The challenge here is that for certain hosting environments such as Microsoft Azure, where a website's underlying OS instance can be changed at any time, such a manual change will be useless since the root certificate will continuously be "refreshed" to its original "erroneous" state.

Some articles have pointed me in the right direction to make this change programmatically ( http://en-us.sysadmins.lv/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List=332991f0-bfed-4143-9eea-f521167d287c&ID=69 and http://forums.asp.net/t/1531893.aspx/1). It seems the only way to do this is using the CryptoAPI.

The following is my console app code to try and achieve this:

class Program
    {
        [DllImport("Crypt32.dll", SetLastError = true, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        public static extern bool CertGetCertificateContextProperty(
            IntPtr pCertContext,
            uint dwPropId,
            Byte[] pvData,
            ref uint pcbData
        );

        [DllImport("Crypt32.dll", SetLastError = true, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        public static extern bool CertSetEnhancedKeyUsage(
            IntPtr pCertContext,
            IntPtr pUsage
        );

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                X509Store store = new X509Store(StoreName.Root, StoreLocation.LocalMachine);
                store.Open(OpenFlags.ReadWrite | OpenFlags.OpenExistingOnly);

                X509Certificate2 cert = store.Certificates.Find(X509FindType.FindBySerialNumber, "344ed55720d5edec49f42fce37db2b6d", false)[0];

                if (!cert.Equals(IntPtr.Zero))
                {
                    uint pcbData = 0;
                    // if the function returns True, then certificate purposes are either disabled or constrained
                    // otherwise (False) valid purposes are determined by certificate's EKU
                    if (CertGetCertificateContextProperty(cert.Handle, 0x9, null, ref pcbData))
                    {
                        // create a buffer for ASN.1 encoded byte array
                        byte[] pvData = new byte[pcbData];
                        // call the function again to write actual data
                        CertGetCertificateContextProperty(cert.Handle, 0x9, pvData, ref pcbData);
                        // instantiate AsnEncodedData object with ASN.1 encoded byte array
                        AsnEncodedData asn = new AsnEncodedData("", pvData);
                        // instaintiate X509EnhancedKeyUsageExtension to retrieve OIDs in a readable form
                        X509EnhancedKeyUsageExtension eku = new X509EnhancedKeyUsageExtension(asn, false);
                        // if none OIDs are defined, then all certificate purposes are explicitly diabled in the properties
                        if (eku.EnhancedKeyUsages.Count == 0)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("All purposes for this certificate are explicitly disabled.");
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            // constrained OIDs
                            OidCollection keyUsages = eku.EnhancedKeyUsages;

                            // disable all purposes by emptying EnhancedKeyUsages
                            IntPtr pUsage = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(0);
                            CertSetEnhancedKeyUsage(cert.Handle, pUsage);                           
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Valid purposes are determined by the certificate EKU extension.");
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("An attempt was made to access an uninitialized object.");
                }

                store.Close();
            }
            catch (CryptographicException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Information could not be written out for this certificate.");
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

The result of this seems positive, since on the 2nd run of the console app all purposes seem disabled, the caveat however is that the changes are not visible in certmgr.msc, purposes still look enabled.

Also, when the above code is placed in Global.asax of my MVC website, it seems to have no effect whatsoever on the certificate.

So my question is 2 fold:

  1. How do I disable all purposes for a certificate resulting in the Windows certificate snap-in displaying the certificate change?

  2. How do I achieve this persistently in ASP.NET?

share|improve this question
    
If your code really tries to change the Extended Key Usages extension, then this most likely breaks the signature of the certificate. Thus, the certificate wont be verifiable anymore in its certificate chain. –  mkl Feb 25 '13 at 14:46
    
@mkl, thank you. How do you then propose I achieve the certificate modification automatically, since this is what the Thawte support team has advised me to change in the root cert? –  ashley brener Feb 25 '13 at 20:15
    
Please supply your public certificate and what thawte exactly purposes. –  mkl Feb 25 '13 at 23:23
    
public certificate at gist.github.com/anonymous/174a5caa180a04bf2c3b –  ashley brener Feb 26 '13 at 10:41
    
This article better explains the requirement from Thawte for any certificates issued after 27 June 2010: ripley.za.net/2010/09/howto/it_howto/… –  ashley brener Feb 26 '13 at 11:05
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