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Is there a way to get around the class-loading issues caused by having two enums that reference each other?

I have two sets of enumerations, Foo and Bar, defined like so:

public class EnumTest {

  public enum Foo {
    A(Bar.Alpha),
    B(Bar.Delta),
    C(Bar.Alpha);

    private Foo(Bar b) {
      this.b = b;
    }

    public final Bar b;
  }

  public enum Bar {
    Alpha(Foo.A),
    Beta(Foo.C),
    Delta(Foo.C);

    private Bar(Foo f) {
      this.f = f;
    }

    public final Foo f;
  }

  public static void main (String[] args) {
    for (Foo f: Foo.values()) {
      System.out.println(f + " bar " + f.b);
    }
    for (Bar b: Bar.values()) {
      System.out.println(b + " foo " + b.f);
    }
  }
}

The above code produces as output:

A bar Alpha
B bar Delta
C bar Alpha
Alpha foo null
Beta foo null
Delta foo null

I understand why it happens - the JVM starts classloading Foo; it sees the Bar.Alpha in Foo.A's constructor, so it starts classloading Bar. It sees the Foo.A reference in the call to Bar.Alpha's constructor, but (since we're still in Foo.A's constructor) Foo.A is null at this point, so Bar.Alpha's constructor gets passed a null. If I reverse the two for loops (or otherwise reference Bar before Foo), the output changes so that Bar's values are all correct, but Foo's values are not.

Is there any way to get around this? I know I can create a static Map and a static Map in a 3rd class, but that feels fairly hackish to me. I could also make Foo.getBar() and Bar.getFoo() methods that refer to the external map, so it wouldn't even change my interface (the actual classes I have use inspectors instead of public fields), but it still feels kind of unclean to me.

(The reason I'm doing this in my actual system: Foo and Bar represent types of messages that 2 apps send to each other; the Foo.b and Bar.f fields represent the expected response type for a given message - so in my sample code, when app_1 receives a Foo.A, it needs to reply with a Bar.Alpha and vice-versa.)

Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The best way is use the enum polymorphism technique:

public class EnumTest {
    public enum Foo {
        A {

            @Override
            public Bar getBar() {
                return Bar.Alpha;
            }
        },
        B {

            @Override
            public Bar getBar() {
                return Bar.Delta;
            }
        },
        C {

            @Override
            public Bar getBar() {
                return Bar.Alpha;
            }
        },

        ;

        public abstract Bar getBar();
    }

    public enum Bar {
        Alpha {

            @Override
            public Foo getFoo() {
                return Foo.A;
            }
        },
        Beta {

            @Override
            public Foo getFoo() {
                return Foo.C;
            }
        },
        Delta {

            @Override
            public Foo getFoo() {
                return Foo.C;
            }
        },

        ;

        public abstract Foo getFoo();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (Foo f : Foo.values()) {
            System.out.println(f + " bar " + f.getBar());
        }
        for (Bar b : Bar.values()) {
            System.out.println(b + " foo " + b.getFoo());
        }
    }
}

The above code produces the output you want:

A bar Alpha
B bar Delta
C bar Alpha
Alpha foo A
Beta foo C
Delta foo C

See also:

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The issue isn't so much "two enums reference each other", it's more "two enums reference each other in their constructors". This circular reference is the tricky part.

How about using Foo.setResponse(Bar b) and Bar.setResponse(Foo f) methods? Instead of setting a Foo's Bar in the Foo constructor (and similarly a Bar's Foo in the Bar constructor), you do the initialization using a method? E.g.:

public enum Foo {
  A, B, C;

  setResponse(Bar b) {
    this.b = b;
  }

  public final Bar b;
}

static {
  A.setResponse(Bar.Alpha);
  B.setResponse(Bar.Delta);
  C.setResponse(Bar.Alpha);
}

Also, you mention that Foo and Bar are two types of messages. Would it be possible to combine them into a single type? From what I can see, their behavior here is the same. This doesn't fix the circular logic, but it might give you some other insight into your design...

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Since it seems you're going to be hard-coding anyways, why not have something like

public static Bar responseBar(Foo f) {
 switch(f) {
  case A: return Bar.Alpha;
  // ... etc
 }
}

for each enum? It looks like you have some overlapping responses in your example, so you could even take advantage of cases falling through.

EDIT:

I like Tom's suggestion of the EnumMap; I think performance is probably faster on the EnumMap, but the sort of elegant construction described in Effective Java doesn't seem to be afforded by this particular problem - however, the switch solution offered above would be a good way to construct two static EnumMaps, then the response could be something like:

 public static Bar response(Foo f) { return FooToBar.get(f); }
 public static Foo response(Bar b) { return BarToFoo.get(b); }
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1  
Or an EnumMap if you prefer that to a switch. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 1 '09 at 22:02
    
(Careful how you intialise that though - see Effective Java.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 1 '09 at 22:03

Interesting design. I see your need, but what are you going to do when the requirements shift slightly, so that in response to Foo.Epsilon, app_1 should send either a Bar.Gamma or a Bar.Whatsit?

The solution you considered and discarded as hackish (putting the relation into a map) seems to give you much more flexibility, and avoids your circular reference. It also keeps the responsibility partitioned: the message types themselves shouldn't be responsible for knowing their response, should they?

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