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I have next class:

public class A
{
    public int MyProperty { get; set; }
}

And the following code in Main:

object obj = new A();

Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
var res = obj as A;
if (res != null)
{
    res.MyProperty = 10;
    Console.WriteLine("obj is A (as)" + sw.Elapsed);
}
sw.Stop();

Stopwatch sw2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
if (obj.GetType() == typeof(A))
{
    A a = (A)obj;
    a.MyProperty = 10;
    Console.WriteLine("obj is A (GetType)" + sw2.Elapsed);
}
sw2.Stop();

Stopwatch sw3 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
var isA = obj is A;
if (isA)
{
    A a = (A)obj;
    a.MyProperty = 19;
    Console.WriteLine("obj is A (is)" + sw3.Elapsed);
}
sw3.Stop();

Console.ReadKey();

The results are:

obj is A (as) 00:00:00.0000589
obj is A (GetType) 00:00:00.0000024
obj is A (is) 00:00:00.0000006

The point is that operator 'is' works always faster than 'as'. Why 'as' is slower than 'is'? Even GetType() faster than 'as'. What stands for 'as' operator that cause such delays comparing to 'is' and GetType().

share|improve this question
1  
Because as performs is before casting the object or returning null? –  Nolonar Feb 25 '13 at 10:04
    
Hope this link is helpful brijbhushan.net/2011/03/11/… –  zenwalker Feb 25 '13 at 10:05
1  
What happens if you switch the order in which you run your tests? If I put GetType as the first test, all of a sudden it's the slowest (and there's nothing to choose between is and as) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 25 '13 at 10:06
1  
You should average out 1 million executions of each one. Don't do anything else until you're through with all of it, then output whatever data you need. –  Alex Feb 25 '13 at 10:07
    
@Nolonar - actually, in either case, the isinst instruction is used in the IL. is checks whether the result is null. as can skip this step, because it just needs to use the result (which is either a correct object instance or null) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 25 '13 at 10:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it could be due to the fact that you are also setting MyProperty, so the first time you do that the property setter is JIT-compiled.

Try running this code, with and without the commented lines, and check the difference:

    object obj = new A();

    // uncomment these lines and see the difference
    // A tmp = new A();
    // tmp.MyProperty = 100;

    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    var res = obj as A;
    if (res != null) {
        res.MyProperty = 10;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("as : " + sw.Elapsed);

    Stopwatch sw2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    if (obj.GetType() == typeof(A)) {
        A a = (A)obj;
        a.MyProperty = 10;
    }
    sw2.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("GetType : " + sw2.Elapsed);

    Stopwatch sw3 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    var isA = obj is A;
    if (isA) {
        A a = (A)obj;
        a.MyProperty = 19;
    }
    sw3.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("is : " + sw3.Elapsed);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for sample! I tested it and I found the difference you are talking about. Can you describe why first setting of property slower than others? –  Igor Lozovsky Feb 25 '13 at 10:39
    

I would guess that it's the first Console.Write that has to open a stream to the console, so that takes a lot more time.

Anyway, writing to the console takes so much more time than doing a cast, so you can't draw any conclusion at all about the castings from your test.

Doing the casts a billion times and don't write anything to the console for each cast, gives you a more reasonable result:

object obj = new A();
int iterations = 1000000000;

Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
  var res = obj as A;
  if (res != null) {
    res.MyProperty = 10;
  }
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("obj is A (as)" + sw.Elapsed);

Stopwatch sw2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
  if (obj.GetType() == typeof(A)) {
    A a = (A)obj;
    a.MyProperty = 10;
  }
}
sw2.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("obj is A (GetType)" + sw2.Elapsed);

Stopwatch sw3 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
  var isA = obj is A;
  if (isA) {
    A a = (A)obj;
    a.MyProperty = 19;
  }
}
sw3.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("obj is A (is)" + sw3.Elapsed);

Example output:

obj is A (as)00:00:00.3937249
obj is A (GetType)00:00:00.3452988
obj is A (is)00:00:01.0193541
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm sure it's the first use of something that's causing the first test to be slower. I'm not sure whether it can be the use of console, since by the time the WriteLine call is issued, sw.Elapsed has already been evaluated (and formatted into a string). –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 25 '13 at 10:15
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: Good point, the WriteLine is actually outside the time, when I think of it. It could be something like memory management that gives the varying results when timing only a single cast. –  Guffa Feb 25 '13 at 10:29
    
In my case using your code gives (as) 6secs, (getType) - 11secs and (is) - 7secs, but the main idea of your explanations I understood. –  Igor Lozovsky Feb 25 '13 at 10:49

Your measurements are incorrect if they show that "as" is slower than "is".

The reason that can't be the case is that both the "as" and the "is" keywords generate an isinst IL instruction, but the "is" instruction generates an additional check of the return value.

You do not need to perform any timings to determine this, because you can examine the generated IL code using reflector.

For example, this method:

static bool isTest(object value)
{
    return value is Random;
}

Generates this IL:

.method private hidebysig static bool isTest(object 'value') cil managed
{
    .maxstack 8
    L_0000: ldarg.0 
    L_0001: isinst [mscorlib]System.Random
    L_0006: ldnull 
    L_0007: cgt.un 
    L_0009: ret 
}

While this:

static object asTest(object value)
{
    return value as Random;
}

Generates:

.method private hidebysig static object asTest(object 'value') cil managed
{
    .maxstack 8
    L_0000: ldarg.0 
    L_0001: isinst [mscorlib]System.Random
    L_0006: ret 
}

The "is" keyword generates identical IL to the "as" keyword plus some additional instructions; therefore, "is" must be slower than "as" for this kind of usage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this details! I didn't know about this. –  Igor Lozovsky Feb 25 '13 at 10:42

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