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I am trying to run an Django application behind NGINX and uWSGI but am having problems with datetime.today() returning the datetime from when the uWSGI server was started insted of today. The configuration for the app is as follows:


    <uwsgi>
     <plugin>python</plugin>
       <socket>127.0.0.1:3030</socket>
       <chdir>/opt/ETS/bin</chdir>
       <pythonpath>..</pythonpath>
       <module>instance</module>
     </uwsgi>

The settings for the uWSGI is the defaults with no changes.

How can i get the datetime to work again?

Clarification: the call is made in this function on access to a url

def create_file_header(name, ext):
    return {'Content-Disposition': 'attachment; filename=%s-%s.%s' % (name, datetime.date.today(), ext) }

the call is from a urlpatten:

(r'^loading_details/basic2/$', ExpandedResource(ReadLoadingDetailHandler, authentication=authentication, 
                                               headers=create_file_header('loading-details', 'csv')), 
 FORMAT_CSV, "api_loading_details_basic_auth"),

It worked when hosted on same server using Apache WSGI

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you store datetime.date.today() in a module global, it will only be executed once, at server startup. This is not a server problem, but a problem with your code.

If you need a result to show todays date, you need to call the datetime.date.today() callable when you need todays date, not at startup.

Even if you were to call today() in a function, if that function itself is only called at module load time, it still is executed only once.

The URL patterns are generated only once. The headers keyword argument is not executed each time that URL is accessed, but only at module load time. You'll need to move creating tha header to the view itself.

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I am not calling it on startup but from within an function –  tcarlander Feb 25 '13 at 11:13
    
@tcarlander: And what calls that function? Is the result of that function stored at module load time? –  Martijn Pieters Feb 25 '13 at 11:17
    
Thanks, that explains it. I still do not see why it worked on Apache WSGI and not on uWSGI, I suppose that they run differently. –  tcarlander Feb 26 '13 at 4:45
    
check the uwsgi-docs.readthedocs.org/en/latest/ThingsToKnow.html page. It explains the fork() usage (and how you can change it) –  roberto Feb 26 '13 at 6:15
    
@tcarlander: Apache probably started a new process for every URL you tested. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 9:43

Are you sure is not the wrong timezone instead of uWSGI startup time ? uWSGI does not touch python internals (unless expressely requested in some area).

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Yes I am sure, the date stays the same until I restart the uWSGI server. –  tcarlander Feb 26 '13 at 4:40

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