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Can someone explain why there is two different result sets in the following SQL's.

SQL 1-

SELECT e.employee_id,e.first_name,
e.department_id,
d.department_id,
d.department_name
FROM employees e  RIGHT OUTER JOIN departments d
ON (e.department_id = d.department_id) where d.department_name='Treasury'; 

Result: Records where d.department_name='Treasury' only.

SQL 2-

SELECT e.employee_id,e.first_name,
e.department_id,`enter code here`
d.department_id,
d.department_name
FROM employees e  RIGHT OUTER JOIN departments d
ON (e.department_id = d.department_id) and d.department_name='Treasury'; 

Result: Records with all d.deparment_name values.

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Have you tried comparing each query's results with and without the d.department_name='Treasury' condition? –  Andriy M Feb 25 '13 at 15:10
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3 Answers 3

The on condition is used when looking for matching rows in the joined table. With an outer join (a right or left join), rows that do not match the on condition can still end up in the result set.

The where condition is applied to all selected rows. Any row that fails the where test is excluded from the result set.

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The first one returns any joined records whose department_name is 'Treasury', so every record in department table will be joined, but the second one means only the records in departments table with a department_name 'Treasury' will be joined.

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First put the condition on all the records fethched after applying join and all, so it is applied to the final returned result.

While the second one returns all the records from right table even if join condition does not match as it is right join.

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