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I wrote a function which generates a list of randomized ints in OCaml.


let create_shuffled_int_list n = 
  Random.self_init;
  let rec create n' acc =
    if n' = 0 then acc
    else 
      create (n'-1) (acc @ [Random.int (n/2)])
  in 
  create n [];;

When I tried to generate 10000 integers, it gives Exception: RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded. error.

However, I believed in the function, I have used tail-recursion and it should not give stackoverflow error, right?

Any idea?

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Hm, works fine for me, even with 100000. However, your function is extremely inefficient, because you are appending to the end of the accumulator every time, which gives O(n^2) runtime. –  Andreas Rossberg Feb 25 '13 at 11:45
    
@AndreasRossberg Are you using a variant standard library? Works for me with Jane Street Core, but the stdlib @ isn't tail recursive. –  Impredicative Feb 25 '13 at 11:47
    
The definition of this function seems deeply wrong in many respects -- for example a function with the name "shuffle" usually guarantees some form of fairness/uniformity in the distribution, which is not at all the case with your function, so it's likely wrong. Could you give more high-level details on what you're expecting this function to do? –  gasche Feb 25 '13 at 13:02
    
Correction: I actually only ran 10000, not 100000 (sorry!). But that definitely works. Nothing non-standard about my installation. Perhaps stack space differs across architectures? –  Andreas Rossberg Feb 25 '13 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the core library documentation

val append : 'a list -> 'a list -> 'a list Catenate two lists. Same function as the infix operator @. Not tail-recursive (length of the first argument). The @ operator is not tail-recursive either.

So it's not your function that's causing the overflow, it's the @ function. Seeing as you only care about producing a shuffled list, however, there's no reason to be appending things onto the end of lists. Even if the @ operator were tail-recursive, list append is still O(n). List prepending, however, is O(1). So if you stick your new random numbers on the front of your list, you avoid the overflow (and make your function much much faster):

let create_shuffled_int_list n = 
  Random.self_init;
  let rec create n' acc =
    if n' = 0 then acc
    else 
      create (n'-1) (Random.int (n/2) :: acc)
  in 
  create n [];;

If you care about the order (not sure why), then just stick a List.rev on the end:

List.rev (create n []);;
share|improve this answer
    
then what I should use to produce a tail-recursive, if I want to keep the elements in order as creation –  Jackson Tale Feb 25 '13 at 12:06
1  
You should use either Batteries or Core. And to keep the element in order, create the list in reverse, and then reverse it when fully built. –  Ashish Agarwal Feb 25 '13 at 12:13
    
@JacksonTale I've edited to include details on how you'd overcome this. –  Impredicative Feb 25 '13 at 12:14
    
thanks. I asked for the order, because I am just an OCaml learner, so I want to know basic things about OCaml. Also that's why I am not trying to use any better lib. –  Jackson Tale Feb 25 '13 at 12:22
    
@JacksonTale: you are posting a lot of questions about OCaml, which is fine, but what we see from them is that you are sticking to programming style that you picked up in some other language. I strongly suggest that you learn the style and the ways of thinking along with OCaml itself. –  Andrej Bauer Feb 25 '13 at 22:36

As an aside, you should not call Random.self_init in a function, since:

  • the user of your function may want to control the seed in order to obtain reproductible results (testing, sharing results...)

  • this may reset the seed with a not so random entropy source and you probably want to do this only once.

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Welcome to StackOverflow. There is a lot of insight in what you say and it would barely fit in a comment, but since you are not directly answering the question, a comment (or several of them) is how you would be supposed to react here. Except that you cannot comment with 1 rep. Strange rules, I know (I did not make them). One trick in this situation (when you cannot comment or what you have to say does not fit in the size constraints of a comment) is to concisely answer the question before commenting on the lateral aspects. –  Pascal Cuoq Feb 26 '13 at 19:42
    
Thank your for the tip. I looked up the FAQ to find out how to comment in this case and ended up using the answer form instead. One should be allowed to comment before answering for real. I guess the rule comes from the will to promote actual solutions over opinions and discussions. –  rixed Feb 27 '13 at 21:23

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