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I am not clear on the following:
Assume I have a table A and I have created an index on column X.
If I do select based on the column that result will be sorted, right?
But if for some reason I did a select followed by an ORDER BY X (e.g. I was unaware that the column was indexed) will the SQL server do the sort performing sequential access or will it go and use the index?

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What do You mean by "SQL server". Microsoft SQL Server or ... ? –  iddqd Feb 25 '13 at 12:18
    
@iddqd:Any sql server implementation –  Cratylus Feb 25 '13 at 12:19

3 Answers 3

If you don't specify an ORDER BY in your SELECT query, then there's no guaranteed / no deterministic ordering of any kind.

The data will be returned - but there's no guarantee of any order (or that it will be returned in the same order next time you query for it)

So if you need an order - then you must specify an ORDER BY in your SELECT - it's as simply as that.

And yes - if there's an index in place, and if it makes sense - then the SQL Server query optimizer will indeed use that index. But there are a lot of ifs and buts involved - it might - or might not - use the index - that's entirely up to the optimizer to decide (and this depends on a lot of factors - too many to list here).

(this specifically applies to SQL Server which I know well - I don't know how other RDBMS handle this situation)

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But doesn't an index create a B-Tree?So aren't the date accessed in ordered fashion? –  Cratylus Feb 25 '13 at 12:20
    
@Cratylus: sure - an index creates a B-Tree - but that doesn't mean any select using that column would be ordered in any way..... –  marc_s Feb 25 '13 at 12:21
    
Really?I thought that it did.Perhaps it is implementation detail? –  Cratylus Feb 25 '13 at 12:26
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There is no guarantee of any order - unless you SPECIFICALLY ask for it using ORDER BY . Just get used to it. –  marc_s Feb 25 '13 at 12:27
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@Cratylus - e.g. SQL Server might scan the index in allocation order rather than index key order. Or use the merry go round scan feature. –  Martin Smith Feb 25 '13 at 12:31

Whether or not the RDMS will use the index or not depends on the predicates in your SQL query, what other indexes are on the table and how the optimiser chooses to execute your query..

So if you have SELECT A, X FROM T WHERE A = some_value ORDER BY X

and there is an index on A then the RDMS may (emphasis on MAY) choose to access the data via that index rather than the index on T. This means the SELECT will be followed by a sort.

As with most database questions, the answer is "It depends"

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Without ORDER BY in your SELECT, then there is no no deterministic ordering of any kind.

Indexing plus sorting is quite complex story. It depends on RDBMS , RDBMS version and data in table.

1 000 000 rows in table

comment table
i - int, unique number from sequence/auto_increment etc. 
created - long, indexed
updated - long, indexed
title - varchar(50) - indexed
body - text

Selects:

SELECT id FROM comments;

Oracle,MySQL,Postgresql return records completely randomly. You can have the illusion of order. However, after some administrative work vacuum, table analyze, optimize table; everything can change

SELECT * FROM comments ORDER BY created DESC;

Postgresql and Oracle will perform full table scan.

SELECT created FROM comments ORDER BY created; 

Oracle will perform full index scan (only index data) but Postgresql will perform full table scan.

SELECT * FROM comments WHERE created>sysday-7 ORDER BY created DESC;

Postgresql and Oracle will perform index range scan and read data from table.

SELECT created FROM comments WHERE created>sysday-7  ORDER BY created;

Oracle will perform index range scan (no read from table) but Postgresql will perform index range scan and read data from table.

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