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I have two simple applications:

  • A Server application that waits on a specific tcp port for a client to connect. Then listens to what he says, send back some feedback and DISCONNECT that client.

  • A Form application that connects to the server application, then says something, then wait for the feedback and disconnect from the server, then show the feedback in the form.

Though the server application seems to behave correctly (I have tested it with Telnet and I see the feedback and I see the disconnect occurring directly after the feedback), the form application however doesn't seem to notice the disconnect from the server. ( TcpClient.Connected seems to stay true even after the server has disconnected )

My question is: why is TcpClient.Connected staying true and how can I know if/when the server has disconnected?

Here is my full code:

Form application:

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Threading;

namespace Sender
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void sendButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            TcpClient tcpClient = new TcpClient();
            tcpClient.Connect(IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1"), 81);
            responseLabel.Text = "waiting for response...";
            responseLabel.Invalidate();

            // write request
            NetworkStream networkStream = tcpClient.GetStream();
            byte[] buffer = (new ASCIIEncoding()).GetBytes("Hello World! ");
            networkStream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            networkStream.Flush();

            // read response
            Thread readThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(ReadResponse));
            readThread.Start(tcpClient);
        }

        void ReadResponse(object arg)
        {
            TcpClient tcpClient = (TcpClient)arg;
            StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            NetworkStream networkStream = tcpClient.GetStream();
            bool timeout = false;
            DateTime lastActivity = DateTime.Now;
            while (tcpClient.Connected && !timeout)
            {
                if (networkStream.DataAvailable)
                {
                    lastActivity = DateTime.Now;
                    while (networkStream.DataAvailable)
                    {
                        byte[] incomingBuffer = new byte[1024];
                        networkStream.Read(incomingBuffer, 0, 1024);
                        char[] receivedChars = new char[1024];
                        (new ASCIIEncoding()).GetDecoder().GetChars(incomingBuffer, 0, 1024, receivedChars, 0);
                        stringBuilder.Append(receivedChars);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    if (DateTime.Now > lastActivity.AddSeconds(60))
                        timeout = true;
                }
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
            }
            Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
            {
                responseLabel.Text = "Response from Listener:\n" + stringBuilder.ToString();
                responseLabel.Invalidate();
            });

            if (timeout)
            {
                Console.Write("A timeout occured\n");
                networkStream.Close();
                tcpClient.Close();
            }
        }

    }
}

Server application:

using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Text;
using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace Listener
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var tcpListener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 81);
            tcpListener.Start();
            Thread clientThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Listen));
            clientThread.Start(tcpListener);
        }

        static void Listen(object arg)
        {
            TcpListener tcpListener = (TcpListener)arg;
            while (true)
            {
                TcpClient tcpClient = tcpListener.AcceptTcpClient();
                Thread clientThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(HandleClient));
                clientThread.Start(tcpClient);
            }
        }

        static void HandleClient(object arg)
        {
            TcpClient tcpClient = (TcpClient)arg;
            StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            ASCIIEncoding encoder = new ASCIIEncoding();
            DateTime lastActivity = DateTime.Now;

            // read request
            NetworkStream networkStream = tcpClient.GetStream();
            int timeout = 5; // gives client some time to send data after connecting
            while (DateTime.Now < lastActivity.AddSeconds(timeout) && stringBuilder.Length==0)
            {
                if (!networkStream.DataAvailable)
                {
                    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
                }
                else
                {
                    while (networkStream.DataAvailable)
                    {
                        lastActivity = DateTime.Now;
                        byte[] incomingBuffer = new byte[1024];
                        networkStream.Read(incomingBuffer, 0, 1024);
                        char[] receivedChars = new char[1024];
                        encoder.GetDecoder().GetChars(incomingBuffer, 0, 1024, receivedChars, 0);
                        stringBuilder.Append(receivedChars);
                    }
                }
            }
            string request = stringBuilder.ToString();

            // write response
            string response = "The listener just received: " + request;
            byte[] outgoingBuffer = encoder.GetBytes(response);
            networkStream.Write(outgoingBuffer, 0, outgoingBuffer.Length);
            networkStream.Flush();

            networkStream.Close();
            tcpClient.Close();
        }
    }

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

TcpClient / NetworkStream does not get notified when the connection is closed. The only option available to you is to catch expcetions when writing to the stream.

A few years back we moved to using sockets instead of tcp client. socket is more useable as compared to tcpclient.

there are a couple of methods that you can use

Poll is one of them

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.sockets.socket.poll.aspx

You can also do a check on outcome of Write itself. it gives you the number of bytes actually written.

The Connected property itself only reflects the state at the last operation. Its documentation states "The value of the Connected property reflects the state of the connection as of the most recent operation. If you need to determine the current state of the connection, make a nonblocking, zero-byte Send call. If the call returns successfully or throws a WAEWOULDBLOCK error code (10035), then the socket is still connected; otherwise, the socket is no longer connected."

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.sockets.socket.connected.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
agreed, socket would be a far better option to use here –  XikiryoX Feb 25 '13 at 12:53
    
NetworkStream itsself uses a Socket (though its not a public propertie). How would I be able to use that? In other words: If I was using Socket, how would I proceed to know if the client has disconnected? –  nl-x Feb 25 '13 at 12:59
1  
I don't really understand it yet. Why poll the socket (I think this means actually trying to use the socket and see if it fails, thus causing overhead), while the server already has told the client that it has disconnected. Even telnet directly sees the disconnect and warns me, so this message must be sent from the server and the OS passes this message to the application... Can you please help me understand? –  nl-x Feb 25 '13 at 13:22
1  
Just to be absolutely clear: So c#/.NET does not remember if the connected party has gracefully disconnected? It will poll the connection to know if the connection is disconnected, even if the connected party has gracefully disconnected earlier? –  nl-x Feb 25 '13 at 13:31
1  
Answer accepted. Though I still don't fully agree. The RFC tools.ietf.org/html/rfc793#page-38 (case 2) states that the user (application?) will be told a FIN (disconnect announcement) has been received. This elementary bit of data MUST be present somewhere in .NET... –  nl-x Feb 25 '13 at 14:26
networkStream.DataAvailable

This property doesn't notify you if the socket is closed on the server side.

In your situation, you can either implement a "keepalive" function where you poll the connection every t minutes/seconds, or add lots of try/catches whenever you try to read or write from the socket. When I use TCP, i just include a Reconnect() method that goes into every catch statement.

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