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I'd like to intercept the onclick event of a button (not submit) before the page posts back from the onclick.

I'm having some trouble:

$(document).ready() { function() {
    function validate() { 
        ...
    }

    var oldOnClick = $("input[value=OK]").attr("onclick");
    $("input[value=OK]").attr("onclick", "if(!validate()) { return false; }" + oldOnClick));
});
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you still want to handle the button click event instead of the form submit event as all suggested, you could do something like this, using an anonymous function, to call your oldOnClick function, preserving the context and the event argument:

$(document).ready(function () {
  function validate() { 
    // ...
  }

  var oldOnClick = $("input[value=OK]").get(0).onclick;
  $("input[value=OK]").click(function (e) {
    if(!validate()) {
      return false;
    }
    oldOnClick.call(this, e); // enforce the context and event argument
  });
});
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This is exactly what I wanted. Although it still posts back I can work from here. –  LB. Oct 1 '09 at 22:52
    
I unbounded the onclick event prior to assigning the new click event. This worked. Thanks again! –  LB. Oct 1 '09 at 23:09
    
You're welcome LB! –  CMS Oct 1 '09 at 23:23

Rather than trying to intercept the onClick event, you should use the submit event.

Why? Simple, not all forms are submitted by clicking, what about tab, enter, etc?

$("form").submit(function() { // do validation/stuff here }); will do the trick.

You can return false; to stop the form submitting, or return true; if you want to let it through. Do your validation within the .submit itself.

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1  
Doesn't work with ASP.NET pages. –  LB. Oct 1 '09 at 22:08
    
That's the documented way of doing things, so it's either ASP being a major pain in the ass or your code is incorrect. Try keeping it simple, such as $("form").submit(function() { alert('Hello world.'); return false; }); which should stop the submission and also through a JS alert. –  jakeisonline Oct 1 '09 at 22:16
    
Jakeisonline has a good point - it is easy to get tripped up by assuming that everyone will use your page the way you do (i.e., clicking with a mouse). This is not always the case. –  BryanH Oct 1 '09 at 22:23
1  
The reason why this would not work is because the button is not a submit button, they used the onclick event to submit. –  LB. Oct 1 '09 at 22:24
    
I have edited the question. I'm trying to intercept an onclick event of a button (not a submit form button or related submit form behavior). –  LB. Oct 1 '09 at 22:27

OnSubmit is called just before the form is submit. You can even cancel the event, so the form isn't submitted.

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e.preventDefault();

More specifically you need to do this

$("#Your_form_id").submit(function(e) {
e.preventDefault();
// your code
});

The other way to do this, is as Jake says, return false after doing some work ... ie:

$("#Your_form_id").submit(function() {
// your code
return false;
});

See the Jquery documentation on Submit and Events in general

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