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I am in a position to choose between function pointers and subclassed objects. To make it clear, say I have to notify some object of some action (a timer for example); refer to the following two choices (a very basic code for demo purposes):

Version 1

typedef void TimerCallback(void *args);
class Timer{
public:
  Timer();
  ~Timer();
  void schedule(TimerCallback *callback, void *args, long timeout)=0;
  void cancel();
};

Version 2

class TimerTask{
  public:
    TimerTask();
    virtual ~TimerTask();
    void timedout()=0;
};
class Timer{
  public:
    Timer();
    virtual ~Timer();
    void schedule(TimerTask *callback, long timeout)=0;
    void cancel();
};

which one is the standard C++ way and which one is efficient? Please let me know if you have any other suggestions in this regard.

Please let me know if I am not clear in this regard.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Google "observer pattern". –  Luchian Grigore Feb 25 '13 at 12:51
    
TimerTask is essentially an interface, and it is often used in scenarios like this. On the other hand, using a function pointer gives some more flexibility as you can wrap anything into a function/functor. Besides, with interface, you will usually have to take care of deleting the object (if you don't use smart pointers), which you don't need with fn pointers. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Feb 25 '13 at 12:54
    
your question does not have one single answer... it depends on the desired style. But all in all you should take a look at different suggestions. –  fen Feb 25 '13 at 13:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I would say std::function and std::bind. Then it doesn't matter if you want to use inherited classes, standalone functions, member functions or lambdas.


By the way, if anyone is curious I made a simple timer event handling some time ago, as an answer to another question. It's showcasing the use of e.g. std::function and std::bind: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11866539/440558.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - this answer is most true to the spirit of C++ –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Feb 25 '13 at 12:59
    
Thanks Joachim. This is a very useful tip. I shall have a look into this. –  user630286 Feb 25 '13 at 15:20
    
Though I am going to implement the Object Oriented approach for this implementation this one is the route I am supposed to take in the long run. Thanks for all your answers guys. –  user630286 Feb 26 '13 at 9:33

I think it's better to use boost(or std since C++11)::function to hold callback and boost::bind to bind it's arguments, or to use boost::signal. That would be more general and verbose solution at cost of really small penalty.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_53_0/doc/html/signals2.html

share|improve this answer

You are using object-oriented programming and you should follow the object-oriented programming paradigms.

In my opinion using objects, not function pointers, is the cleaner and generally better way to do.

You can also attempt to use a visitor pattern to make the code even better and more flexible.

You can also consider publisher/subscriber pattern.

share|improve this answer
2  
C++ is multi-paradigm language, so I would be careful with stating that he is using object-oriented programming. Actually, it is not possible, in my opinion, to give correct answer without knowing more about the rest of the system (e.g. who will delete the callback instances, when and how) –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Feb 25 '13 at 12:57
    
@ZdeslavVojkovic based on the code I was given I made a point; I agree that it's debatable, but as I stated it's an opinion. From my experience I know that most often using function pointers is both unnecessary and harder to do that using objects. Not to mention the increased difficulty to maintain the code. –  Dariusz Feb 25 '13 at 13:00
    
I agree about function pointers if they are used in C manner, but the right answer is what Joachim Pileborg has proposed (IMO, of course) –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Feb 25 '13 at 13:13
    
@ZdeslavVojkovic yeah, I upvoted it too:) Still, I think I offered some insight that might be useful. –  Dariusz Feb 25 '13 at 13:15

Function pointer effectively prevents you to use closures - assigning methods to you event handler (This is not entirely true, but it will restrict you in such way, that this solution is not much of a use).

I would vote on object-oriented approach. If you use C++11, you may simplify your code a lot:

#include <cstdio>
#include <functional>

class Emitter
{
private:
    std::function<void(int)> eventHandler;

public:
    void SetEventHandler(std::function<void(int)> newEventHandler)
    {
        eventHandler = newEventHandler;
    }

    void EmitEvent()
    {
        eventHandler(42); // + error-checking
    }
};

class Handler
{
private:
    void HandleEvent(int i)
    {
        printf("Event handled with i == %d\n", i);
    }

public:
    void AttachEmitter(Emitter & e)
    {
        e.SetEventHandler([this](int i) { HandleEvent(i); });
    }
};

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    Emitter e;
    Handler h;

    h.AttachEmitter(e);
    e.EmitEvent();
}
share|improve this answer

Both work. Your first one is "C style" and will require a static function somewhere. The second version is "C++ style" and allows you to use an instance of TimerTask.

Generally, version 2 should be used because it removes the need for a static function.

share|improve this answer
1  
but it introduces the need to delete the task object. Besides, in modern C++ it is easy to wrap almost anything into a function or use lambda. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Feb 25 '13 at 12:55
    
Thanks guys. As I mentioned in the original example, in case of a timer implementation, I don't want to tie the task to a single function implementation which is the case with static functions. If I implement TimerTask subclassing, I shall let the implementor to do anything with the timeout. The task can vary with the module. Is this not correct? –  user630286 Feb 25 '13 at 15:11
    
When somebody provides the pointer, they should be responsible for making it available until it is needed and clean it up after the task is complete (except in cases like QT where you specify a parent object which then will adopt the new object and clean it up after using). Is that not correct either? –  user630286 Feb 25 '13 at 15:19

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