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Compared to the preceding code for class RulyCanceler, I wanted to run code using CancellationTokenSource.

How do I use it as mentioned in Cancellation Tokens, i.e. without throwing/catching an exception? Can I use the IsCancellationRequested property?

I attempted to use it like this:

cancelToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

and

try
{
  new Thread(() => Work(cancelSource.Token)).Start();
}
catch (OperationCanceledException)
{
  Console.WriteLine("Canceled!");
}

but this gave a run-time error on cancelToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested(); in method Work(CancellationToken cancelToken):

System.OperationCanceledException was unhandled
  Message=The operation was canceled.
  Source=mscorlib
  StackTrace:
       at System.Threading.CancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested()
       at _7CancellationTokens.Token.Work(CancellationToken cancelToken) in C:\xxx\Token.cs:line 33
       at _7CancellationTokens.Token.<>c__DisplayClass1.<Main>b__0() in C:\xxx\Token.cs:line 22
       at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart_Context(Object state)
       at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean ignoreSyncCtx)
       at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
       at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart()
  InnerException:

The code that I successfully ran caught the OperationCanceledException in the new thread:

using System;
using System.Threading;
namespace _7CancellationTokens
{
  internal class Token
  {
    private static void Main()
    {
      var cancelSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
      new Thread(() =>
      {
         try
         {
           Work(cancelSource.Token); //).Start();
         }
         catch (OperationCanceledException)
         {
            Console.WriteLine("Canceled!");
         }
         }).Start();

      Thread.Sleep(1000);
      cancelSource.Cancel(); // Safely cancel worker.
      Console.ReadLine();
    }
    private static void Work(CancellationToken cancelToken)
    {
      while (true)
      {
        Console.Write("345");
        cancelToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
      }
    }
  }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You can implement your work method as follows:

private static void Work(CancellationToken cancelToken)
{
    while (true)
    {
        if(cancelToken.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            return;
        }
        Console.Write("345");
    }
}

That's it. You always need to handle cancellation by yourself - exit from method when it is appropriate time to exit (so that your work and data is in consistent state)

UPDATE: I prefer not writing while (!cancelToken.IsCancellationRequested) because often there are few exit points where you can stop executing safely across loop body, and loop usually have some logical condition to exit (iterate over all items in collection etc.). So I believe it's better not to mix that conditions as they have different intention.

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1  
Thanks! This does not follow from the online text, quite authoritative (book "C# 4.0 in a Nutshell"?) I cited. Could you give me a reference about "always"? –  Fulproof Feb 25 '13 at 13:37
1  
This comes from practice and experience =). I can't remember where from I know this. I used "you always need" because you actually can interrupt the worker thread with exception from outside using Thread.Abort(), but that's a very bad practice. By the way, using CancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested() is also "handle cancellation by yourself", just the other way to do it. –  Oleksandr Pshenychnyy Feb 25 '13 at 13:57
    
^ that's correct. It would just be instead of the if block above you would put cancelToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();. Sometimes the documentation / books are off (even when written by MVPs, etc.) -- it's unfortunate, but maybe it will be fixed in the next edition. In the meanwhile, perhaps you can check if the book has an online errata site (and if the mistake isn't mentioned, perhaps you can submit your findings to the author for future correction). –  BrainSlugs83 Feb 10 at 22:54
1  
@OleksandrPshenychnyy I meant replace while(true) with while(!cancelToken.IsCancellationRequested). This was helpful! Thanks! –  Doug Dawson Feb 27 at 16:11
1  
@Fulproof There's no generic way for a runtime to cancel running code because runtimes are not smart enough to know where a process can be interrupted. In some cases it is possible to simply exit a loop, in other cases more complex logic is needed, ie transactions have to be rolled back, resources have to be released (eg file handles or network connections). This is why there no magical way of canceling a task without having to write some code. What you think of is like killing a process but that's not cancel that's one of the worst things can happen to an application because can't clean up. –  user3285954 Jun 25 at 14:57

You can use it like this:

  var cancelToken = new CancellationTokenSource();
  Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoEthernalWork(), cancelToken.Token);

  Thread.Sleep(1000); //simulate some other work

  //this stops the Task:
  cancelToken.Cancel(false); //false indicates that no exceptions will be thrown.
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I can't get this to work -- whether I pass true or false, the task continues to run. What am I missing? –  BrainSlugs83 Dec 12 '13 at 23:07
    
Oh, lame -- you have to actually have access to the CancellationToken in your long running method and call "token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();" at the point where you want the exception thrown -- what's the point of that? You could just say if (token.IsCancellationRequested) { throw new MyExceptionBecauseBlah(); } -- also, still not seeing a difference between true or false -- exception gets thrown either way. –  BrainSlugs83 Dec 12 '13 at 23:15
1  
@BrainSlugs83 That's simple, CancellationToken is a communication standard to allow intentional cancellation of tasks in a universal way. So instead of having to pass the intent a million different ways like it used to be before (ie. using things like e.Cancel = true or bool _aborted; while (!aborted) ..., you now have a simple common scheme - does your method support cancellation? Allow it to get a CancellationToken parameter, and use that to ask if the cancellation is requested. The class itself doesn't really do any "magic", unlike Thread.Abort or Process.Kill. –  Luaan Jan 29 at 15:31
1  
That doesn't answer either of my questions at all. I get that it's a unified mechanism, but 1.) what's the point of the "ThrowIfCancellationRequested" aside from looking pretty (reread my above comment with the code sample), and 2.) In practice, there does not appear to be a difference between passing true or false -- (from my own tests, I believe the comment in the answer is wrong) -- so what does that parameter ACTUALLY do? –  BrainSlugs83 Feb 1 at 23:41
    
@Luaan Thread.Abort and Process.Kill are not cancellations and should only be used as a last resort. Cancel has to implemented in threads and processes similar to how is implemented with tasks and cancellation tokens, i.e. one has to pass in a flag to the thread, check its status regularly and exit thread when flag is signaled. The only difference between cancellation tokens and pre-cancellation tokens world is that before there was no API for cancellations so everyone had to come up with their own implementation. Now is much easier to implement cancel in operations involving multiple objects. –  user3285954 Jul 8 at 9:48

@BrainSlugs83

You shouldn't blindly trust everything posted on stackoverflow. The comment in Jens code is incorrect, the parameter doesn't control whether exceptions are thrown or not.

MSDN is very clear what that parameter controls, have you read it? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd321703(v=vs.110).aspx

If throwOnFirstException is true, an exception will immediately propagate out of the call to Cancel, preventing the remaining callbacks and cancelable operations from being processed. If throwOnFirstException is false, this overload will aggregate any exceptions thrown into an AggregateException, such that one callback throwing an exception will not prevent other registered callbacks from being executed.

The variable name is also wrong because Cancel is called on CancellationTokenSource not the token itself and the source changes state of each token it manages.

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