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I have an NHibernate interceptor, that overrides the Instanciate method, and does the following:

  • if the class to be instantiated inherits a certain base class, return a CastleDynamicProxy
  • otherwise just instatiate the class

While this sounds rather easy (and works already), I'd still feel better if I could prove its functionality with a Unit Test.

Here's the Interceptor code :

    public override object Instantiate(string entityTypeName, EntityMode entityMode, object id)
    {
        // Type resolution across Assembly borders
        Type type = TypeFinder.FindType(entityTypeName);

        if (type == null)
        {
            throw new Exception(string.Format("",entityTypeName));
        }

        bool isViewModel = (typeof(ViewModelBase).IsAssignableFrom(type));

        if (entityMode == EntityMode.Poco && isViewModel)
        {
            var instance = ProxyFactory.CreateProxy(type);
            SessionFactory.GetClassMetadata(entityTypeName).SetIdentifier(instance, id, entityMode);
            return instance;
        }
        return base.Instantiate(entityTypeName, entityMode, id);
    }

I can test my proxy generation code sucessfully, but base.Instantiate always returns null. Here's my test code (As you see, I've even added a real Database, just in case the Interceptor needs a valid session):

    private FluentConfiguration PrepareDataBase()
    {
        string connectionString = @"Data Source=test.sdf;";
        SqlCeEngine en = new SqlCeEngine(connectionString);
        en.CreateDatabase();

        FluentConfiguration fc = Fluently.Configure().Database(MsSqlCeConfiguration.Standard
                                                              .ConnectionString(c => c.Is(connectionString))
                                                              .ShowSql())
                                   .Mappings(x => x.FluentMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<ViewModel>());

        new SchemaExport(fc.BuildConfiguration()).Create(true, true);
        return fc;
    }

    [TestMethod]  
    [DeploymentItem("System.Data.SqlServerCe.dll")]
    public void Test_Instantiate_WithNonViewModelBasedPoco_ReturnsInstance()
    {
        TypeFinder.RegisterAssembly(typeof(OtherPoco).Assembly);
        FluentConfiguration fc = PrepareDataBase();

        NhChangeNotificationInterceptor interceptor = new NhChangeNotificationInterceptor(); 
        ISession session = fc.BuildSessionFactory().OpenSession(interceptor);

        string instanceType = typeof(OtherPoco).FullName;
        object instance = interceptor.Instantiate(instanceType, EntityMode.Poco, null);

        Assert.AreEqual(typeof(OtherPoco).FullName, instance.GetType().FullName);
        Assert.IsFalse(typeof(ViewModelBase).IsAssignableFrom(instance.GetType()));
    }

I thought it might be a problem with the null identifier, so I saved a record and tried to add its Id like so:

        NhChangeNotificationInterceptor interceptor = new NhChangeNotificationInterceptor(); 
        ISession session = fc.BuildSessionFactory().OpenSession(interceptor);
        using (ITransaction trx = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            session.Save(new OtherPoco() { Id = 1 });
            session.Flush();
        }
        string instanceType = typeof(OtherPoco).FullName;
        object instance = interceptor.Instantiate(instanceType, EntityMode.Poco, 1);

Doesn't change anything, though. Any idea how I can test base.Instantiate?

share|improve this question
    
is base.Instantiate your code? if not then i see little value in unit testing it. if you want 100% code coverage then you could wrap the base.Instantiate call into a virtual method that you could assert is called. –  wal Feb 25 '13 at 14:05
    
base.Instantiate is not my code. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Sebastian Edelmeier Feb 25 '13 at 14:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I wouldn't try to write unit tests for this. An interceptor is tightly coupled with NH/database - it's better to write integration test for this.

Don't try to test your lines of code. Instead, test your functionality. You've already stated what your interceptor should do ("if the class to be instantiated inherits a certain base class, return a CastleDynamicProxy otherwise just instatiate the class"). Test this instead! If you later want to use some other technique than an interceptor to get the same result, you shouldn't be forced to modify your tests.

So instead of calling interceptor.Instantiate directly from your test, make some integration tests that verifies that it does what it should when fetching data from db.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting point of view, thanks! –  Sebastian Edelmeier Feb 25 '13 at 15:16

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