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I'm developing an application using SQLAlchemy and wxPython that I'm trying to keep distributed in separated modules consisting of Business logic, ORM and GUI.

I'm not completely sure how to do this in a pythonic way.

Given that mapping() has to be called in orther for the objects to be used, I thought of putting it on the __init__.py of the bussiness logic, but keeping all the table definitions within a separate orm.py module.

Should I keep something like:

/Business
    /__init__.py
    |    mapping (module1.Class1, orm.table1)
    |
    /module1.py
         Class1

/orm.py
     import
     table1 = Table()
/GUI
    /main.py
    |    import business
    /crud.py

or something like

/Business
    /__init__.py
    |    import
    |
    /module1.py
         Class1
         table1 = Table()
         mapping (module1.Class1, orm.table1)

/GUI
    /main.py
    |    import business
    /crud.py

Is the first approach recommended? Is there any other option? I've seen the second way, but I don't like putting the database handling code and the bussiness logic code within the same module. Am I overthinking it? Is really not that big a problem?

share|improve this question
    
Seems like this question might touch more than just SQLAlchemy -- any pythonic best practices on how to organize project code that interfaces significantly with a database? –  ariddell Oct 2 '09 at 11:43
    
@aridell: you might be right, but SQLAlchemy has a specific way of setting the mappings, that may or may not be different to the way other existing ORMs or custom ORMs do it. But its definitely not wxPython specific. –  voyager Oct 2 '09 at 12:52

1 Answer 1

I find this document by Jp Calderone to be a great tip on how to (not) structure your python project. Following it you won't have issues. I'll reproduce the entire text here:

Filesystem structure of a Python project

Do:

  • name the directory something related to your project. For example, if your project is named "Twisted", name the top-level directory for its source files Twisted. When you do releases, you should include a version number suffix: Twisted-2.5.
  • create a directory Twisted/bin and put your executables there, if you have any. Don't give them a .py extension, even if they are Python source files. Don't put any code in them except an import of and call to a main function defined somewhere else in your projects.
  • If your project is expressable as a single Python source file, then put it into the directory and name it something related to your project. For example, Twisted/twisted.py. If you need multiple source files, create a package instead (Twisted/twisted/, with an empty Twisted/twisted/__init__.py) and place your source files in it. For example, Twisted/twisted/internet.py.
  • put your unit tests in a sub-package of your package (note - this means that the single Python source file option above was a trick - you always need at least one other file for your unit tests). For example, Twisted/twisted/test/. Of course, make it a package with Twisted/twisted/test/__init__.py. Place tests in files like Twisted/twisted/test/test_internet.py.
  • add Twisted/README and Twisted/setup.py to explain and install your software, respectively, if you're feeling nice.

Don't:

  • put your source in a directory called src or lib. This makes it hard to run without installing.
  • put your tests outside of your Python package. This makes it hard to run the tests against an installed version.
  • create a package that only has a __init__.py and then put all your code into __init__.py. Just make a module instead of a package, it's simpler.
  • try to come up with magical hacks to make Python able to import your module or package without having the user add the directory containing it to their import path (either via PYTHONPATH or some other mechanism). You will not correctly handle all cases and users will get angry at you when your software doesn't work in their environment.
share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted as its a good guideline. I'm happy that it was pretty close to my gut feeling design (tm). –  voyager Oct 2 '09 at 14:32
1  
this seems like good general advice but doesn't seem to answer the original question completely. –  leonigmig Dec 5 '11 at 21:18

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