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I have the code below that should do bring to me a list of users. I was testing the "Take" function to do a pagination but it just doesn't work.

using (MyContainer myContainer = new MyContainer())
{
    // Works
    var user = myContainer.User.Where(u => u.Name == Name).ToList();
    // The "Name" comes from User.Name
    // myContainer is generated by my edmx he inherits the ObjectContext in the design generated by edmx as it shows below
    //// public partial class MyContainer : ObjectContext

    // Does not work
    var foo = (from t in myContainer.User
               select t.Name).Take(10);

    return user;
}

Why the being so similar to the first doesn't work.

Throw exception "Cannot convert Lambda expression to type 'string' because it is not a delegate type"

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closed as not constructive by usr, Henk Holterman, Claus Jørgensen, Bob Kaufman, WiredPrairie Feb 26 '13 at 1:22

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2  
What exactly is the problem that you're having? It's unclear. – IronMan84 Feb 25 '13 at 14:15
1  
"Doesn't work" is really not enough... Did you interpret the error message yet? – usr Feb 25 '13 at 14:15
1  
What is the definition of the Name property? Does it has some computation? – Ilya Ivanov Feb 25 '13 at 14:17
    
it's not "Does not work" I'm just trying to understand the code. Like it says on FAQ "However, if your motivation is “I would like others to explain ______ to me”, then you are probably OK." – Michel Ayres Feb 25 '13 at 14:22
    
@IlyaIvanov As I stated in a comment on the code. // The "Name" comes from User.Name saying it, you can see that User is a table that was generated by my edmx – Michel Ayres Feb 25 '13 at 14:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't expect the 2 forms to work identically, as they're different. you can express the 2nd in function chain like this:

var foo = myContainer.User.Select(u => u.Name).Take(10);

which, as expected, doesn't work like the first form, as it returns an IEnumerable<string> when the first returns an List<User>

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Now it makes senses. I just got lost of the track and didn't noticed that – Michel Ayres Feb 25 '13 at 14:28

First expression returns a list of Users.

Second expression returns a list of Names (name is probably a string).

You should probably do something like:

var user = myContainer.User.Where(u => u.Name == Name).Take(10).ToList();

As a sidenote, I believe that you need a little bit more for pagination, I guess using .Skip(something).Take(something)

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Thanks. Going to test it. =) Looks very promising =) – Michel Ayres Feb 25 '13 at 14:25
    
I took Stephane's answer as the right one because the explaining of the reason. But upvoted yours. Thanks for the sidenote. Really helpful – Michel Ayres Feb 25 '13 at 14:36

Try myContainer.User.Take(10).ToList() to get a list of first 10 users or myContainer.User.Take(10).Select(iter => iter.Name).ToList() to get the list of first 10 names.

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Thanks! that's really a good advice. – Michel Ayres Feb 25 '13 at 14:41
var user = myContainer.User.Where(u => u.Name == Name).ToList();

and

var foo = (from t in myContainer.User
           select t.Name).Take(10);

are not proper ways to write. If you do not return any value from either you will get ArgumentNullException. You need to first make sure you return at least a single value - meaning check for null - before you call

.ToList() 

or

.Take(10)
share|improve this answer
    
Why vote down? Is that not true? – Mukus Feb 25 '13 at 14:30
    
No, it's not true. – Kendall Frey Feb 25 '13 at 14:30
    
    
    
Where and Select do not return null. – Kendall Frey Feb 25 '13 at 14:32

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