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What is the cleanest and most Pythonic way to get tomorrow's date? There must be a better way than to add one to the day, handle days at the end of the month, etc.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 42 down vote accepted

datetime.date.today() + datetime.timedelta(days=1) should do the trick

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timedelta can handle adding days, seconds, microseconds, milliseconds, minutes, hours, or weeks.

>>> import datetime
>>> today = datetime.date.today()
>>> today
datetime.date(2009, 10, 1)
>>> today + datetime.timedelta(days=1)
datetime.date(2009, 10, 2)
>>> datetime.date(2009,10,31) + datetime.timedelta(hours=24)
datetime.date(2009, 11, 1)

As asked in a comment, leap days pose no problem:

>>> datetime.date(2004, 2, 28) + datetime.timedelta(days=1)
datetime.date(2004, 2, 29)
>>> datetime.date(2004, 2, 28) + datetime.timedelta(days=2)
datetime.date(2004, 3, 1)
>>> datetime.date(2005, 2, 28) + datetime.timedelta(days=1)
datetime.date(2005, 3, 1)
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It handles leap years ok ? –  ldigas Oct 1 '09 at 23:01
    
@ldigas: yes it does. –  nosklo Oct 2 '09 at 10:31

Even the basic time module can handle this:

import time
time.localtime(time.time() + 24*3600)
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Most elegant solution out of all –  Greg Feb 1 '13 at 20:16
    
This fails on the boundaries of Daylight Savings Time in the united states, because at those boundaries one day will have 23 hours and one day will have 25 hours. This also does not take leap seconds into account. –  Charles Wood Aug 14 at 23:12
    
@CharlesWood: this answer may return a different hour that (in some timezones) means it may return a different date (not tomorrow) but it always returns the time that is exactly 24 hours ahead (the accepted answer returns midnight (unknown hours from now)). I don't see how leap seconds can change the result here unless called during a leap second on systems where 23:59:60 and 00:00:00 have the same timestamp. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 4 at 21:46
    
True, it will always be 24 hours from now, but that wasn't the question. OP wanted to know how to get tomorrow's date. The leap seconds thing was just nitpicking ;) –  Charles Wood Sep 4 at 22:01
    
@CharlesWood: yes. I've just clarified that it doesn't return 23, 25 hours. And yes, it may return wrong date (not tomorrow e.g., for "2014-10-18 23:00:00" in "Brazil/East" timezone). Related: Given the current time in UTC, how do you determine the start and end time of the day in a particular timezone?. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 4 at 22:21

No handling of leap seconds tho:

>>> from datetime import datetime, timedelta
>>> dt = datetime(2008,12,31,23,59,59)
>>> str(dt)
'2008-12-31 23:59:59'
>>> # leap second was added at the end of 2008, 
>>> # adding one second should create a datetime
>>> # of '2008-12-31 23:59:60'
>>> str(dt+timedelta(0,1))
'2009-01-01 00:00:00'
>>> str(dt+timedelta(0,2))
'2009-01-01 00:00:01'

darn.

EDIT - @Mark: The docs say "yes", but the code says "not so much":

>>> time.strptime("2008-12-31 23:59:60","%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")
(2008, 12, 31, 23, 59, 60, 2, 366, -1)
>>> time.mktime(time.strptime("2008-12-31 23:59:60","%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"))
1230789600.0
>>> time.gmtime(time.mktime(time.strptime("2008-12-31 23:59:60","%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")))
(2009, 1, 1, 6, 0, 0, 3, 1, 0)
>>> time.localtime(time.mktime(time.strptime("2008-12-31 23:59:60","%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")))
(2009, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 3, 1, 0)

I would think that gmtime or localtime would take the value returned by mktime and given me back the original tuple, with 60 as the number of seconds. And this test shows that these leap seconds can just fade away...

>>> a = time.mktime(time.strptime("2008-12-31 23:59:60","%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"))
>>> b = time.mktime(time.strptime("2009-01-01 00:00:00","%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"))
>>> a,b
(1230789600.0, 1230789600.0)
>>> b-a
0.0
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time.strftime handles leap seconds: see Note 2: docs.python.org/library/time.html#time.strftime and Note 3: docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#strftime-behavior –  Mark Rushakoff Oct 2 '09 at 0:18
    
This is because Unix time doesn't handle leap seconds. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_time#History, mail-archive.com/leapsecs@rom.usno.navy.mil/msg00094.html, and POSIX itself. –  Roger Pate Nov 29 '09 at 23:37
    
"each and every day shall be accounted for by exactly 86400 seconds" opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/… –  Roger Pate Nov 29 '09 at 23:42
    
Leap years account for the difference between the solar year and an even 365 days, while leap seconds are inherently different and account for differences caused by external factors like earthquakes. This makes them irregular and can't be determined in the same way as, e.g. determining the day of the week that March 3rd, 2055 will land on. –  David Woods Mar 4 '13 at 14:04
    
@DavidWoods: leap seconds are to keep UTC within +/- 0.9 seconds from UT1 (Earth rotation). There are 25 leap seconds accumulated from 1972 to 2012. Earthquakes are too weak to cause it (a single earthquake may introduce microsecond changes -- thousand times less than a typical millisecond difference in the duration of the day from 86400 SI seconds). –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 4 at 21:56

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