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I'm doing a little program to simulate use basic string. It currently not working consistently.

In this case program work fine :

a = a+ w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5 ; 

But if I write same sentence in this way all work bad :

a = + w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5 ; 

Can anyone explain to me what's wrong in my program ?

class sstring {
public:
    string s;

    sstring() {s.assign("");}

    template <class T>
    sstring& operator=(T i) {
        s = to_string( i );
        return *this;
    }

    sstring& operator=(const char *i) {
        s = i;
        return *this;
    }

    sstring& operator=(const wchar_t *w) {
        wstring ws = w;
        s.assign ( ws.begin(),ws.end() );
        return *this;
    }

    sstring& operator=(wstring w) {
        s.assign ( w.begin(),w.end() );
        return *this;
    }
    // *********************************************** +
    template <class T>
    sstring& operator+(T i) {
        s.append( to_string( i ));
        return *this;
    }

    sstring& operator+(const char *i) {
        s.append(i);
        return *this;
    }

    sstring& operator+(const wchar_t *i) {
        wstring ws = i;
        ws.assign(i);
        string cs;
        cs.assign ( ws.begin(),ws.end() );
        s.append( cs );
        return *this;
    }

    sstring& operator+(wstring w) {
        string temp;

        temp.assign( w.begin(),w.end() );
        s.append ( temp );
        return *this;
    }
    //*************************************************** <<
    friend ostream& operator<<( ostream &out,sstring obj);

};

ostream& operator<<( ostream &out,sstring obj) {
    out << obj.s;
    return out;
}

int main(void) {
    sstring a;
    wstring w;

    w = L"claudio";
    a = "daffra";
    a = a + w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5;

    cout << "\ns :" << a;

    return 1;
}
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2  
I'm not sure I understand "a = + w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5 ;" is not syntactically correct. Did you mean "a += w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5;"? Cause in that case you will need to explicitly define the operator += function. –  Vishesh Handa Feb 25 '13 at 14:29
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2 Answers

This a = w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5 doesn't work, because w is not of type sstring so your operator+ overloads are not used. Try e.g. prepending an empty sstring: a = sstring() + w + 10 + " " + L"x" + 65.5;.

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These two lines will give the same result:

int x;

x = x + 4;
x += 4;

The alternative line you suggested, is of the form:

x =+ 4;

Which is PARSED the same as:

x = +4;

Which we see as (although this can be overloaded for classes):

x = 4;

This will also apply to your wstring and sstring classes if they implement what most people would expect to be normal behavior. From a cursory scan, it looks like you are attempting to keep with that behavior.

Additional Comments: Let's look at two parse trees.

a = a + 9 + " ";

This will do:

operator+(typeof(a), int);
operator+(typeof_previous_line, const char *);

It's possible that you've overloaded your type + an int, and + a const char* to work.

On the other hand:

a += 9 + " ";

That will do:

operator+(int, const char *);
operator+=(typeof_previous_line);

It's likely that you don't have the first of those two operations defined. A common fix for this is to cast the first item to your result type. So something like:

a += sstring(9) + " ";    // or
a += sstring() + 9 + " ";
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thank you for reply : but when i try to do this : a = 90 + " " + 5 ; overload does not work. in my above program all work if i use a = a + ... and i wan't to do in this way. –  Claudio Daffra Feb 25 '13 at 14:39
    
@user2107435: I've added some additional comments, that ended up being similar to Henrik's as well. –  sharth Feb 25 '13 at 15:04
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