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so I just want to find wether a date is before today or a day in future. So basiclly I have this construction:

function data(startdate, enddate)
{
    var that = this;
    start = startdate;
    end = enddate;

    var today = new Date();
    today = today.getTime();
    today = Date.parse(today);

    this.status = false; // True = Server is in maintenance
    this.init = function()
    {
        isDone();
    }
    function isDone(){
        if( Date.parse(start) < today && today < Date.parse(end))
        {       
            that.status = true;
            console.log(that.status);
        }else
        {
            that.status = false;
            console.log(that.status);
        }
    }
}

Than I call it like this:

var x1 = new Date(2013,2,23,12,3,45);
var x2 = new Date(2013,2,27,12,3,45);

var foobar = new data(x1,x2);
foobar.init();

So tried to figure out, what javascript creates:

start:1364036625000 
end: 1364382225000 
today: 1361796935000 

I also parsed it back into the standard format:

start:Sat Mar 23 2013 12:03:45 GMT+0100 
end:Wed Mar 27 2013 12:03:45 GMT+0100 
today:Mon Feb 25 2013 13:54:56 GMT+0100

So I have no idea, how to fix it or how it could work...

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1  
today = Date.parse(new Date().getTime()); looks horrible. What is it supposed to do? –  Bergi Feb 25 '13 at 14:30
    
Did you notice that start and end are in March? –  Bergi Feb 25 '13 at 14:32
    
Its purpose is to get the current time and parse it into seconds. Nope I didn't noticed it :C big failure... –  Leagis Feb 25 '13 at 14:36
    
I guess you mean milliseconds. And you don't need to do that, it would be done automatically for Date objects when operating mathematically on them (-, *, <, …). And Date.parse expects strings, not Date objects. –  Bergi Feb 25 '13 at 15:30
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem isn't explicitly stated but you seem to forget (or ignore) that months are zero-indexed in javascript. February is 1.

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1  
THANKS facepalm.de/images/facepalm.jpg –  Leagis Feb 25 '13 at 14:35
    
Most programmers working with dates in Java or JavaScript have been bitten by this indexing at least once... –  dystroy Feb 25 '13 at 14:40
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