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there's probably really an simple explaination as to what I'm doing wrong, but I've been working on this for quite some time today and I still can not get this to work. I thought this would be a walk in the park, however, my code isn't quite working as expected.

So for this example, let's say I have a data frame as followed.

df
Row#   user      columnB    
1        1          NA        
2        1          NA        
3        1          NA        
4        1          31        
5        2          NA        
6        2          NA        
7        2          15        
8        3          18        
9        3          16       
10       3          NA

Basically, I would like to create a new column that uses the first (as well as last) function (within the TTR library package) to obtain the first non-NA value for each user. So my desired data frame would be this.

df
Row#   user      columnB    firstValue
1        1          NA        31
2        1          NA        31 
3        1          NA        31
4        1          31        31
5        2          NA        15
6        2          NA        15 
7        2          15        15
8        3          18        18
9        3          16        18
10       3          NA        18

I've looked around mainly using google, but I couldn't really find my exact answer.

Here's some of my code that I've tried, but I didn't get the results that I wanted (note, I'm bringing this from memory, so there are quite a few more variations of these, but these are the general forms that I've been trying).

    df$firstValue<-ave(df$columnB,df$user,FUN=first,na.rm=True)
    df$firstValue<-ave(df$columnB,df$user,FUN=function(x){x,first,na.rm=True})
    df$firstValue<-ave(df$columnB,df$user,FUN=function(x){first(x,na.rm=True)})
    df$firstValue<-by(df,df$user,FUN=function(x){x,first,na.rm=True})

Failed, these just give the first value of each group, which would be NA.

Again, these are just a few examples from the top of my head, I played around with na.rm, using na.exclude, na.omit, na.action(na.omit), etc...

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
    
Ah, I apologize, it was actually those extra html links that were acting funny. Anyways, I've added the text. Thanks. – user1342086 Feb 25 '13 at 15:27
    
Sorry, I deleted my comment when I saw your edit. Thanks for correcting it. – juba Feb 25 '13 at 15:28
2  
Note that you should replace all the na.rm=True with na.rm=TRUE. – juba Feb 25 '13 at 15:30
2  
Haven't tested, but (following @Arun's now-deleted answer): ddply(df, .(user), transform, firstValue=ifelse(is.na(columnB),NA,na.omit(columnB)[1])) ? – Ben Bolker Feb 25 '13 at 15:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A data.table solution

require(data.table)
DT <- data.table(df, key="user")
DT[, firstValue := na.omit(columnB)[1], by=user]
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I used and it got what I wanted, thanks. – user1342086 Feb 26 '13 at 11:14

Here is a solution with plyr :

ddply(df, .(user), transform, firstValue=na.omit(columnB)[1])

Which gives :

  Row user columnB firstValue
1   1    1      NA         31
2   2    1      NA         31
3   3    1      NA         31
4   4    1      31         31
5   5    2      NA         15
6   6    2      NA         15
7   7    2      15         15
8   8    3      18         18
9   9    3      16         18

If you want to capture the last value, you can do :

ddply(df, .(user), transform, firstValue=tail(na.omit(columnB),1))
share|improve this answer
2  
I think you could use na.omit(columnB)[1] ? – Ben Bolker Feb 25 '13 at 15:35
    
@BenBolker Ah yes, it's much nicer. Edited. Thanks ! – juba Feb 25 '13 at 15:36
1  
probably you should replace [1] with first(.) from the TTR package as the OP was asking for using this function. – Arun Feb 25 '13 at 15:37
    
Thanks everyone, I'll give it a try tomorrow. And I'll try it using the first(.) and last(.). – user1342086 Feb 25 '13 at 15:39
1  
@Arun: fair enough, but I suspect that first and last in the TTR package predated head and tail in base-R; also, if one is using a vector I can see how tail(x) is nice sugar for x[length(x)], but head(x) isn't much better than x[1] (the main advantage of first/head is their generality) – Ben Bolker Feb 25 '13 at 15:43

Using data.table

library (data.table)
DT <- data.table(df, key="user")
DT <- setnames(DT[unique(DT[!is.na(columnB), list(columnB), by="user"])], "columnB.1", "first")
share|improve this answer
    
Did you test this? – Arun Feb 25 '13 at 15:40
    
No, I'm on my iPhone. No bueno? what happened? :) – Ricardo Saporta Feb 25 '13 at 15:42
    
error happens :) – Arun Feb 25 '13 at 15:44
    
@Arun, better? this should work – Ricardo Saporta Feb 25 '13 at 16:02
    
Thanks for your help, unfortunately, I didn't get a chance to try this because the second attempt was using Arun's solution. But it looks similar to his. Thanks again. – user1342086 Feb 26 '13 at 11:20

Using a very small helper function

finite <- function(x) x[is.finite(x)]

here is an one-liner using only standard R functions:

df <- cbind(df, firstValue = unlist(sapply(unique(df[,1]), function(user) rep(finite(df[df[,1] == user,2])[1], sum(df[,1] == user))))

For a better overview, here is the one-liner unfolded into a "multi-liner":

# for each user, find the first finite (in this case non-NA) value of the second column and replicate it as many times as the user has rows
# then, the results of all users are joined into one vector (unlist) and appended to the data frame as column
df <- cbind(
  df,
  firstValue = unlist(
    sapply(
       unique(df[,1]),
       function(user) {
         rep(
           finite(df[df[,1] == user,2])[1],
           sum(df[,1] == user)
         )
       }
    )
  )
)
share|improve this answer
1  
why do you check for is.finite instead of is.na? this would exclude NaN, Inf etc.. including NA, which may not be desirable.. – Arun Feb 25 '13 at 15:51
    
it's always nice to have the base-R example for comparison, but the relative complexity of the solution does show the advantages of plyr and data.table by contrast ... – Ben Bolker Feb 25 '13 at 15:55
    
you could also use do.call(rbind,lapply(split(...),FUN)) to replicate the plyr approach. – Ben Bolker Feb 25 '13 at 15:57
    
@Arun Yes, this is true. I implicitly assumed that the OP was looking for a way to find the first actual number for each user. If this is not desired, just change is.finite to !is.na – QkuCeHBH Feb 25 '13 at 15:57
    
Thanks for the explanation and the write out. – user1342086 Feb 26 '13 at 11:21

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