Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following class

def get_percentile(obs,*args):
    lstper = []
    for arg in args:
        lstper.append(np.percentile(obs,arg))
    return lstper

get_percentile([1,2,3,4,5],25,50,75)
[2.0, 3.0, 4.0]

class Metric(object):
    def __init__(self,*args):
        self.max = max(args)
        self.median =np.median(args)
        self.min = min(args)
        self.percentile = get_percentile(args)

I cannot understand correct set of self.percentile = get_percentile(args) in order to get various percentiles

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Lattyware, Martijn Pieters, larsmans, oefe, Inbar Rose Mar 13 '13 at 8:39

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What do you want to get, what do you currently get? This question is massively unclear. –  Lattyware Feb 25 '13 at 15:49
1  
And what is obs supposed to be then? You don't pass it in. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 25 '13 at 15:50
    
I don't understand what you mean by correct set, but one thing I notice in your code is that get_percentile takes a first argument called obs that you are not passing. –  Thomas Vander Stichele Feb 25 '13 at 15:50
    
No, he is passing obs, the values that all the metrics are calculated over, but not args, the desired percentiles. –  Junuxx Feb 25 '13 at 15:51
    
It depends. How do you want to initialize Metric? –  Junuxx Feb 25 '13 at 15:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just one way to solve this would be to use named keyword arguments instead of *args:

def get_percentile(obs,*args):
    if len(args) == 0:
        args = [25,50,75] # default to quartiles
    lstper = []
    for arg in args:
        lstper.append(np.percentile(obs,arg))
    return lstper

class Metric(object):
    def __init__(self, values=[], percentiles=[]):
        self.max = max(values)
        self.median =np.median(values)
        self.min = min(values)
        self.percentile = get_percentile(values, percentiles)

In action:

>>> m = Metric(range(30,300,13), [20,40,60,80])
>>> m.max
290
>>> m.percentile
[[82.0, 134.0, 186.0, 238.0]]

Alternatively, if you want to keep using args, you could give the values and the percentiles in lists (or tuples, dicts, sets, ...). This is necessary, otherwise it is impossible to tell where one ends and the other begins:

class Metric(object):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        if not len(args) == 2:
            raise ValueError("Usage: Metric([values],[percentiles])")
        values, percentiles = args
        self.max = max(values)
        self.median =np.median(values)
        self.min = min(values)
        self.percentile = get_percentile(values, percentiles)

Usage same as above.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Junuxx but i wish to find a solution where i can use def __init__(self,*args) –  Gianni Spear Feb 25 '13 at 15:59
1  
@Gianni: See edit. It can be done, but it's a bit clumsy. Unless you use some way to separate the two sets of numbers in your *args, it will be impossible to tell what are the values and what are the percentiles. –  Junuxx Feb 25 '13 at 16:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.