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To frame the discussion:

  • Two managed object entities, A and B
  • A and B have a One-to-One, inverse relationship to each other
  • Both directions of the relationship have a Nullify delete rule

The issue: After some time, I am marshaling through instances of entity A and I try to change the relationship to newB (after some time ago there was a relationship to oldB) (eg A.B = newB), and I get a core data exception:

CoreData could not fulfill a fault for '0x1e1515a0 x-coredata://90361082-A433-41A0-9F4E-BA3F032B193D/oldB/p7'

From my research and testing, I am receiving this fault because the referenced oldB entity is deleted and no longer available to core data. (I believe) the exception is being thrown because Core Data is trying to access oldB to nullify the relationship to A, but it obviously can't because oldB is gone.

What I don't understand is how/why I got into this state, because when I (at some time previously in the code's execution) performed a removeObject: oldB, Core Data should have nullified the relationship so when I am performing the above, I expect A.B == nil already.

I will say that this does appear to be working properly the vast majority of the time. However, when this does happen, the app is completely unusable until the database is deleted/restored.


So, I am looking to have a few questions answered:

  • Why could this be happening? Is it possible this is an effect of development efforts (eg maybe killing a process before the removeObject:oldB completes, etc.) that would not necessarily happen in production?
  • What are my recovery options? I suppose I could use a @try and @catch exception handler, but I'm not sure if that would make a difference in the end because the same problem would happen in the @catch handler, unless there is some core data trick I am not aware of to "force kill" the relationship (which I don't think would exist because it would technically break the data graph).
  • In the case of my data graph, the relationship between A and B is "loose" and doesn't really matter (in fact B objects are deleted after they have completed their job). Because I have a clean-up process in place for B which is independent of A, am I better of just using a "No Action" delete policy such that Core Data won't choke in these rare instances?

I appreciate any insights you may have in advance!


UPDATE:

I've been playing around some @try and @catch blocks. Here is what I have been finding:

@try {
 if (A.B.A) // Relationship check. Will throw exception if B is missing
  nil;
 }
@catch {
 [moc deleteObject:A.B];
 [moc save:nil];
 }

In the above case, the @catch code is run, but upon save, Core Data throws an annotation out:

annotation: repairing missing delete propagation for to-one relationship B on object A

I then try to continue with my code, and I am right back where I started with the fault exception when I try to change A.B again.

So, I tried changing the @catch block to:

@catch {
 [moc deleteObject:A.B];
 A.B = nil;
 [moc save:nil];
}

Interestingly the deleteObject and setting A.B = nil worked, but when saving, the original exception is thrown:

CoreData could not fulfill a fault for '0x2009b1e0 x-coredata://90361082-A433-41A0-9F4E-BA3F032B193D/B/p10'

So, it would appear there is very little I can do in this situation since Core Data is doing its job by maintaining the object graph at all costs (including the ability to run the app!).

Short of re-initing the entire data store, any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Does the entity for A have a custom setter for the relationship to B? Are you observing this relationship anywhere? –  Tom Harrington Feb 25 '13 at 18:20
    
No, I use a standard NSManagedObject @dynamic property for getters/setters. The relationship is not monitored from any of my code via KVO. –  mattv123 Feb 26 '13 at 14:30
1  
I'm not sure what's up, but FWIW, deleting B won't make A.B == nil until you save changes. Until then it still points to the old B. –  Tom Harrington Feb 26 '13 at 20:35
    
@TomHarrington So, if my view depend of my model and if delete an entity, do I have to save necessarily ? I thought I could let the user save when he wanted but because of this rule (deleting won't nullify until save), my model is incoherent. –  Colas Jun 17 '13 at 22:28
    
I have opened to related subject on this matter : stackoverflow.com/questions/17158091/… –  Colas Jun 17 '13 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

I was able to work-around the issue by deleting both A and B in the catch block:

@try {
 if (A.B.A) // Relationship check. Will throw exception if B is missing
  nil;
 }
@catch {
 [moc deleteObject:A.B];
 [moc deleteObject:A];
 [moc save:nil];
 }

However, this is not ideal, as A is important (B is not). Fortunately A can be re-generated at a cost that is far less than the cost of losing the entire object graph. For the sake of working production code, I think this solution is suitable, but not ideal.

Still would love an answer that allows the preservation of entity A...

share|improve this answer
1  
I will add that I was performing this work on background MOCs, and I did end up finding a few rare instances in which an NSManagedObject was being passed between MOCs, which is a big NoNo. I have since patched that up (using objectIDs) and better manage my saves, so I no longer have these faulting issues. I suppose the moral of the story is whenever you have faults like this, be absolutely 1000% sure you are not violating any thread confinement issues (by NSLog entries and tracking NSThread values, for example), because that has been at the root of every one of my core data nightmares. –  mattv123 Jun 18 '13 at 22:54

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