Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a stack using a vector, but I can't seem to get it to work... Here is my code:

#ifndef _STACK_VEC_TPT_H_
#define _STACK_VEC_TPT_H_
#include <stdexcept>

using namespace std;

// abstract stack class implemented using vector
template<class T>
class abs_stack_vec {
public:
    // pushes an element onto the top of the stack. 
    // grows the vector if needed.
    virtual void push(const T& elem)=0;

    // pops an element from the top of the stack.
    // does nothing if the stack is empty.
    virtual void pop()=0;

    // returns the value of the top element on the stack.
    // throws domain_error if the stack is empty.
    virtual const T& top()=0;

    // returns the number of elements currently on the stack.
    virtual unsigned size() const=0;
};

// the following class inherits from the abstract stack class
// using its own implementation of a vector
// you must implement the abstract methods push, pop, and top.
template<class T>
class mystack_vec: public abs_stack_vec<T> {
public:
    unsigned size() const {return _size;}

    // method used for growing vector when size equals capacity
    // and need to add more elements
    void grow() {
        T* temp = new T[_size * 2];
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < _size; ++i) {
            temp[i] = _values[i];
        }
        delete[] _values;
        _values = temp;
        _capacity = _size * 2;
    }

    // default constructor
    mystack_vec() {
        _capacity = 5;
        _size = 0;
        _values = new T[_capacity];
    }

    // pushes an element onto the top of the stack. 
    // grows the vector if needed.
    void push(const T& elem)
    {
        if (_size == _capacity)
        {
            grow();
        }
        _values[_size] = (elem);
        ++_size;
    }

    // pops an element from the top of the stack.
    // does nothing if the stack is empty.
    void pop()
    {
        if (_size != 0)
        {
            delete _values[_size];
            --_size;
        }
    }

    // returns the value of the top element on the stack.
    // throws domain_error if the stack is empty.
    const T& top() 
    {
        if (_size == 0)
        {
            throw domain_error("The stack is empty!");
        }
        else
        {
            return _values[_size];
        }
    }

    //destructor
    ~mystack_vec() {
        delete[] _values;
    }

    // TO-DO: YOU MUST IMPLEMENT THE FOLLOWING METHODS:
    // PUSH, POP, TOP


    // END OF TO-DO
private:
    T *_values; // array !!
    unsigned _size, _capacity;
};
#endif

Trying this method I get the error:

1>------ Build started: Project: Lab 3, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>  tester.cpp
1>c:\users\jaysen\documents\data structures\lab 3\lab 3\stack_vec_tpt.h(72): error C2541: 'delete' : cannot delete objects that are not pointers
1>          c:\users\jaysen\documents\data structures\lab 3\lab 3\stack_vec_tpt.h(69) : while compiling class template member function 'void mystack_vec<T>::pop(void)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]
1>          c:\users\jaysen\documents\data structures\lab 3\lab 3\tester.cpp(72) : see reference to function template instantiation 'void mystack_vec<T>::pop(void)' being compiled
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]
1>          c:\users\jaysen\documents\data structures\lab 3\lab 3\tester.cpp(59) : see reference to class template instantiation 'mystack_vec<T>' being compiled
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=int
1>          ]
1>c:\users\jaysen\documents\data structures\lab 3\lab 3\stack_vec_tpt.h(72): error C2059: syntax error : ';'
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

I've also tried including the vector class and using container.push_back() and just push_back, etc. Please help me!

share|improve this question
    
@juanchopanza: Misleading title. OP doesn't use std::vector at all. –  Zeta Feb 25 '13 at 16:29
    
@Zeta good catch! Very misleading indeed. –  juanchopanza Feb 25 '13 at 16:30
    
I mentioned that I tried using the vector class as well. This is for an assignment where we are supposed to implement a stack using a vector. Everything except the push, pop, and top method was already pre-written and cannot be changed. –  Jaysen Stoudt Feb 25 '13 at 16:35
    
@juanchopanza: std::stack pushes and pops from the back of the underlying container (using back(), push_back() and pop_back() respectively for top(), push() and pop()), so I don't see why std::vector's inability to remove from the front is relevant. –  rici Feb 25 '13 at 16:55
    
@rici you are totally right, I don't know what I was thinking. Probably spent too long working with queues today. –  juanchopanza Feb 25 '13 at 16:58

2 Answers 2

The immediate problem is that _values[_size] gives you the last T object in your dynamically allocated array, not a pointer. You cannot do delete _values[_size]; on something that is not a pointer to dynamically allocated memory.

You may, therefore, be tempted to do delete &_values[_size]; but this is also wrong. Just because you dynamically allocated the entire array with _values = new T[_capacity];, doesn't mean you can delete the individual elements. You can only deallocate the entire array with delete[] _values;.

Now you could use std::vector to do it instead, but since you haven't posted the problems you had with that, I can't help you there. However, you are going to too much effort for something that is already provided by the standard:

std::stack<int> s;

The std::stack class is an adapter for other container types. By default, it uses a std::deque as its underlying structure, which is much better suited as a stack than std::vector.

share|improve this answer
    
I realize this, it's for an assignment and I cannot find a way to pop from the "vector" implementation. –  Jaysen Stoudt Feb 25 '13 at 16:34
    
@JaysenStoudt You'll need to access the element with operator[] or at and then you could use pop_back to remove the element. However, a std::deque would be much better for this. –  Joseph Mansfield Feb 25 '13 at 16:36

You can't delete int. You can delete int*, but in this code you try to delete int.

See this message:

c:\users\jaysen\documents\data structures\lab 3\lab 3\stack_vec_tpt.h(72): error C2541: 'delete' : cannot delete objects that are not pointers
share|improve this answer
    
@AI W how can I fix that then? _values is a pointer array, is it not? –  Jaysen Stoudt Feb 25 '13 at 16:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.