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While going through the exercises in RubyMonk (link behind paywall, so not provided), in order to measure the performance of defining methods with eval compared to define_method the following code is provided:

require 'benchmark'

class Monk
  eval "def zen; end"

  define_method(:zen_block) {}
end

monk = Monk.new

Benchmark.bmbm do |x|
  x.report("eval zen: ") { 1_000_000.times { monk.zen } }
  x.report("define_method zen: ") { 1_000_000.times { monk.zen_block } }
end

As a newbie to Ruby, my question is: when are the methods zen and zen_block actually “compiled” (not sure if it’s the right word) by the interpreter? It seems unlikely that both zen and zen_block are redefined on each call. From what I’ve understood so far, it seems to me that to measure performance, the right way would be:

require 'benchmark'

class Monk
  def with_eval
    eval "def zen; end"
  end

  def with_define_method
    self.class.send(:define_method,:zen_block) {}
  end
end

Benchmark.bmbm do |x|
  x.report("eval zen: ") { 1_000_000.times { monk.with_eval } }
  x.report("define_method zen: ") { 1_000_000.times { monk.with_define_method } }
end

The first block produces these results in my machine (I’ve raised the number of iterations to 1 million to make the times a bit more robust):

Rehearsal -------------------------------------------------------
eval zen:             0.070000   0.000000   0.070000 (  0.074196)
define_method zen:    0.120000   0.000000   0.120000 (  0.118621)
---------------------------------------------- total: 0.190000sec

Results from the second block (my proposal):

Rehearsal -------------------------------------------------------
eval zen:             7.740000   0.000000   7.740000 (  7.743741)
define_method zen:    1.620000   0.000000   1.620000 (  1.617666)
---------------------------------------------- total: 9.360000sec
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The benchmark you show from RubyMonk isn't measuring how fast defining methods with eval or define_method is. It's measuring how fast calling the resulting methods is. That's why it reads the way it does.

For reasons which may not be obvious to you until you get to understand more about the implementation of the Ruby interpreter, the speed of methods defined through eval or define_method are generally not the same.

share|improve this answer
    
That was precisely my impression. The text in RubyMonk from this section is: “In this section, we'll benchmark creation of methods between define_method and eval. [Code] As we can see from the results, defining methods using eval() is faster than using define_method. This is because creation of closures takes more time, whereas eval is just creating methods the normal way.” Which, from your explanation as I understand it, is not correct. Thanks for the clarification. –  Alf Feb 25 '13 at 16:34
1  
I'm not familiar with RubyMonk, but this seriously calls their credibility into question. And what they say is completely wrong. (I just benchmarked and found that define_method defines methods much faster than eval, which is what I would expect.) –  Alex D Feb 25 '13 at 16:42
    
Hmm. Just did some benchmarking on Ruby 1.9.3 and came up with interesting results. For some reason, when I add methods to Object using define_method, it's rather slow. In all the other cases I tried, define_method is faster than eval. –  Alex D Feb 25 '13 at 16:46
    
I’ve added some results from running both benchmarks in my machine. I believe that my results are similar to yours. What sort of test did you use to benchmark definitions, not calls? –  Alf Feb 25 '13 at 16:49
1  
Tejas is right, we need to rephrase that section. Eval as a tool is incredibly slow but the code it produces is a normal AST equivalent and performs better than what you'd create with define_method. –  Kai Wren Feb 26 '13 at 4:58

Thanks for pointing this out to us.

You are right, the topic should have been worded as follows: 'Comparing the performance of dynamic methods that have been created by eval v/s methods created by define_method'.

We'll be fixing this bug in our content later today.

Although the performance delta of defining a method is an important consideration, we've never seen it to be of much practical significance (in ruby at least), especially because the AST will get cached.

Tejas

Team RubyMonk

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for getting in touch. I’m marking the first answer as correct because it’s where the main discussion on the topic is, although I’ve also upvoted your reply. –  Alf Feb 26 '13 at 11:51
    
Aside from the problem with the topic, please note that the statement "creation of closures takes more time" was also incorrect (and would tend to give learners a very inaccurate "cost model" of how fast various operations are in Ruby). Creating a closure is actually a very fast operation (basically equivalent to just an object allocation). Additionally, MRI Ruby has compiled to bytecode internally since version 1.9, so what it caches is not the AST, but the bytecode which is produced from compiling the AST. –  Alex D Feb 26 '13 at 14:09

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