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I have a base class Base, which has the method runUserMethod(void * pointer_to_method).

class Base {
    int runUserMethod(METHTYPE pointer_to_method) {
        // do some stuff before
        int retval = pointer_to_method();
        // do some stuff after
        return retval;
    }
};

Now, I want to implement runUserMethod in a way that it is able to run any method implemented by a subclass of Base, provided that such method follows some standard signature, such as int <methodname> (void)

For instance, suppose the user creates the class UserClass like:

class UserClass : public Base {
    int user_method (void);
};

What should METHTYPE be, so that I could do the following?

Base   * b = new UserClass();
int retval = b->runUserMethod(&UserClass::user_method);

Also, would it work? Is there any better way of doing this? Basically, what I'm trying to do is to intercept invocations to subclass method calls, in a more or less transparent way to the user.

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You are aware of that a void* and member function pointers need not necessarily be of the same size (and most often are not), that is casting between them will often fail (besides it being mostly UB anyways)? –  PlasmaHH Feb 25 '13 at 16:51
    
just do UserClass().user_method(). forget all that complexity of a runUserMethod and derived class and whatnot. invoking member functions is trivial. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 25 '13 at 17:01
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf the UserClass and user_method are not known beforehand... I use the runUserMethod function to intercept calls to subclass method. –  Eduardo Bezerra Feb 25 '13 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try making runUserMethod a template method. Also in order to safely cast this from base to derived class you should use dynamic_cast so Base class must by polymorphic (by adding virtual destructor for instance):

class Base {
public:

    template <class T>
    int runUserMethod( int (T::* pointer_to_method)()) {
        T* p = dynamic_cast<T*> (this);
        if (p == NULL) throw std::runtime_error("cast error");


        // do some stuff before
        int retval = (p->*pointer_to_method)();
        // do some stuff after
        return retval;
    }

    virtual ~Base() {};
};

The function usage is the same as in your code sample:

Base* b = new UserClass;
int r = b->runUserMethod(&User::user_method);

Function arguments and return type can also be made template parameters so that runUserMethod accepts other function signatures:

class Base {
public:

    // 0 arguments
    template <class T, class R>
    int runUserMethod( R (T::* pointer_to_method)()) {
        T* p = dynamic_cast<T*> (this);
        if (p == NULL) throw std::runtime_error("cast error");

        // do some stuff before
        R retval = (p->*pointer_to_method)();
        // do some stuff after
        return retval;
    }

    // 1 argument
    template <class T, class R, class ARG1>
    int runUserMethod( R (T::* pointer_to_method)(ARG1), ARG1 arg1) {
        T* p = dynamic_cast<T*> (this);
        if (p == NULL) throw std::runtime_error("cast error");

        // do some stuff before
        R retval = (p->*pointer_to_method)(arg1);
        // do some stuff after
        return retval;
    }

    // 2 arguments
    // [...]

    virtual ~Base() {};
};

This way code below will also work:

class UserClass : public Base {
public:
     int   user_method1 (void)  {return 0;}
     float user_method2 (void)  {return 0.0f;}
     int   user_method3 (int x) {return 0;}
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    Base* b = new UserClass;
    int   r1 = b->runUserMethod(&UserClass::user_method1);
    float r2 = b->runUserMethod(&UserClass::user_method2);
    int   r3 = b->runUserMethod(&UserClass::user_method3, 2);
}
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This is brilliant! It is exactly what I was looking for! For completeness, could you extend your answer with template parameter and return types? Also, how safe is this way of doing things, exactly? –  Eduardo Bezerra Feb 26 '13 at 9:10
    
Dynamic cast will protect you against sibling problem described by @Slava. You can have problems with types deduced for template. For instance if usermethod3 accepts int& instead of int and you are passing a literal constant then the code will not compile. But those problems can by eliminated with Boost.TypeTraits(remove_reference in this specific example). –  Maciek B Feb 26 '13 at 13:47

This can be done using std::function and std::bind:

struct Base
{
    typedef std::function<int()> METHTYPE;

    int runUserMethod(METHTYPE pointer_to_method)
    {
        return pointer_to_method();
    }
};

UserObject b;
auto func_object = std::bind(&UserObject::user_method, std::ref(b));

int retval = b.runUserMethod(func_object);
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1  
Beware that this binds to a copy of b. You'll usually want *b or std::ref(b) as the argument to bind, in order to bind to b itself. –  Mike Seymour Feb 25 '13 at 17:08
    
Thanks for the quick reply, Joachim. However, would it be possible to somehow encapsulate these extra lines of code (with bind, I mean). I want the user to simply run obj->runUserMethod(SOMETHING) instead of obj->SOMETHING(). –  Eduardo Bezerra Feb 25 '13 at 17:33
    
@EduardoBezerra To call a non-static member function, you need both the object instance and the function. There's no way around it. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 26 '13 at 5:46
    
@JoachimPileborg Definitely, but wouldn't that be exactly the this pointer passed to runUserMethod? (i.e., this == obj) –  Eduardo Bezerra Feb 26 '13 at 8:47
    
@EduardoBezerra Yes it would be, but then you have to use inheritance, and probably virtual methods (or this will be the base class object). Using std::bind is more generic. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 26 '13 at 8:53

If you change your example in more real workable state you would see the issue:

int retval       = (this->*methptr)();

Leaving aside ugly syntax, problem is you need to pass "this" pointer which has type Base * to method invocation, but you suppose to pass pointer to method of derived class
So you either need to make runUserMethod aware of derived class (probably by template) or typecast pointer to derived method to a pointer to base method with risk to problems:

class Derived1 : public Base ...
class Derived2 : public Base ...
Derived2 d2;
d2.runUserMethod( static_cast<METHTYPE>( &Derived1::func ) ); // problem Derived2 * will be passed to Deriived1 method and there is no easy way to detect that

So using std::bind would be safer. And you do not have to inherit from Base (I do not know if that good in your case)

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