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The input

 1  -- Narrowing Variable Initialization  
 2  
 3  function main a: integer returns integer;  
 4      b: integer is a * 2.;  
 5  begin  
 6      if a <= 0 then  
 7          b + 3;  
 8      else  
 9          b * 4;  
10      endif;  
11  end;  

is yielding the output

  1  -- Narrowing Variable Initialization
  2  
  3  function main a: integer returns integer;
  4      b: integer is a * 2.;
  5  begin
Narrowing Variable Initialization
  6      if a <= 0 then
  7          b + 3;
  8      else
  9          b * 4;
 10      endif;
 11  end;

Instead of placing that error message under line 4, which is where the error actually occurs. I've looked at it for hours and can't figure it out.

%union
{
    char* ident;
    Types types;
}

%token <ident> IDENTIFIER
%token <types> INTEGER_LITERAL
%token <types> REAL_LITERAL
%token  BEGIN_
%token  FUNCTION
%token  IS
%token  <types> INTEGER
%token  <types> REAL
%token  RETURNS

%type  <types> expression
%type  <types> factor
%type  <types> literal
%type  <types> term
%type  <types> statement
%type  <types> type
%type  <types> variable

%%

program:
    /* empty */ |
    functions ;

functions:
    function_header_recovery body ; |
    function_header_recovery body functions ;

function_header_recovery:
    function_header ';' |
    error ';' ;

function_header:
    FUNCTION {locals = new Locals();} IDENTIFIER optional_parameters RETURNS type {globals->insert($3,locals->tList);} ;

optional_parameters:
    /* empty */ |
    parameters;

parameters:
    IDENTIFIER ':' type {locals->insert($1, $3); locals->tList.push_back($3); } |
    IDENTIFIER ':' type {locals->insert($1, $3); locals->tList.push_back($3); } "," parameters;

type:
    INTEGER | REAL ;

body:
    optional_variables BEGIN_ statement END ';' ;

optional_variables:
    /* empty */ |
    variables ;

variables:
    variable IS statement {checkTypes($1, $3, 2);} |
    variable IS statement {checkTypes($1, $3, 2);} variables ;

variable:
    IDENTIFIER ':' type {locals->insert($1, $3);} {$$ = $3;} ;

statement:
    expression ';' |

...

Types checkTypes(Types left, Types right, int flag)
{
    if (left == right)
    {
        return left;
    }
    if (flag == 1)
    {
        Listing::appendError("Conditional Expression Type Mismatch", Listing::SEMANTIC);
    }
    else if (flag == 2)
    {
        if (left < right)
        {
            Listing::appendError("Narrowing Variable Initialization", Listing::SEMANTIC);
        }
    }
    return REAL_TYPE;
}

printing being handled by:

void Listing::nextLine()
{
printf("\n");
if (error == "")
{
    lineNo++;
    printf("%4d%s",lineNo,"  ");
}
else
{
    printf("%s", error.c_str());
error = "";
nextLine();
}
}

void Listing::appendError(const char* errText, int errEnum)
{
error = error + errText;

if (errEnum == 997)
{
    lexErrCount++;
}
else if (errEnum == 998)
{
    synErrCount++;
}
else if (errEnum == 999)
{
    semErrCount++;
}
}

void Listing::display()
{
printf( "\b\b\b\b\b\b    " );

if (lexErrCount + synErrCount + semErrCount > 0)
{
    printf("\n\n%s%d","Lexical Errors ",lexErrCount);
    printf("\n%s%d","Syntax Errors ",synErrCount);
    printf("\n%s%d\n","Semantic Errors ",semErrCount);
}
else
{
    printf("\nCompiled Successfully\n");
}
}
share|improve this question

That's just the way bison works. It produces a one-token lookahead parser, so your production actions don't get triggered until it has read the token following the production. Consequently, begin must be read before the action associated with variables happens. (bison never tries to combine actions, even if they are textually identical. So it really cannot know which variables production applies and which action to execute until it sees the following token.)

There are various ways to associate a line number and/or column position with each token, and to use that information when an error message is to be produced. Interspersing the errors and/or warnings with the input text, in general, requires buffering the input; for syntax errors, you only need to buffer until the next token but that is not a general solution; in some cases, for example, you may want to associate an error with an operator, for example, but the error won't be detected until the operator's trailing argument has been parsed.

A simple technique to correctly intersperse errors/warnings with source is to write all the errors/warnings to a temporary file, putting the file offset at the front of each error. This file can then be sorted, and the input can then be reread, inserting the error messages at appropriate points. The nice thing about this strategy is that it avoids having to maintain line numbers for each error, which noticeably slows down lexical analysis. Of course, it won't work so easily if you allow constructs like C's #include.

Because generating good error messages is hard, and even tracking locations can slow parsing down quite a bit, I've sometimes used the strategy of parsing input twice if an error is detected. The first parse only detects errors and fails early if it can't do anything more reasonable; if an error is detected, the input is reparsed with a more elaborate parser which carefully tracks file locations and possibly even uses heuristics like indentation depth to try to produce better error messages.

share|improve this answer

As rici notes, bison produces an LALR(1) parser, so it uses one token of lookahead to know what action to take. However, it doesn't ALWAYS use a token of lookahead -- in some cases (where there's only one possibility regardless of lookahead), it uses default reductions which can reduce a rule (and run the associated action) WITHOUT lookahead.

In your case, you can take advantage of that to get the action to run without lookahead if you really need to. The particular rule in question (which triggers the requirement for lookahead) is:

variables:
    variable IS statement {checkTypes($1, $3, 2);} |
    variable IS statement {checkTypes($1, $3, 2);} variables ;

in this case, after seeing a variable IS statement, it needs to see the next token to decide if there are more variable declarations in order to know which action (the first or the second) to run. But as the two actions are really the same, you could combine them into a single action:

variables: vardecl | vardecl variables ;
vardecl: variable IS statement {checkTypes($1, $3, 2);}

which would end up using a default reduction as it doesn't need the lookahead to decide between two reductions/actions.

Note that the above depends on being able to find the end of a statement without lookahead, which should be the case as long as all statements end unambiguously with a ;

share|improve this answer
    
All true, but it seems fragile to me. Presumably there are other possible errors, and it will likely not be possible to be deal with all of them by manipulating the grammar. – rici Feb 25 '13 at 23:12

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