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I have defined a simple model in Django:

class Student(models.Model):
    s_name = models.CharField(max_length=32)
    s_gpa = models.FloatField(min=0.0, max=5.0, default=5.0)
    s_year = models.IntegerField(min=1, max=10, default=1)
    s_registered = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add=True)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.username

    def modify(self, **kwargs):
        if valid(self, kwargs):
            for k,v in kwargs.iteritems():
                setattr(self, k, v)
            self.save()

def valid(s, kwargs):
    # For all k,v pairs in kwargs
    # (1) Checks if k is one of the attributes of s. Returns False if fails.
    # (2) Checks if v fits the format defined for attribute k of s.
    # Returns False if fails.
    # Returns True if reaches this point.

I'm writing the function valid, which I'd like to execute the commands detailed in the comments.
For (1), I use

if k not in s.__dict__: return False

I would need some help with (2).
That is, how can I check if a value fits the format defined for an attribute (Django model field)?

For instance: valid(s_name=True) and valid(s_name=33*'a') should both return False.

Note: I'm trying to solve this validation without using Forms.

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As an aside - it's common practice to use 'self' as the first argument to your method - python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/#function-and-method-arguments –  Aidan Ewen Feb 25 '13 at 17:49
    
Thank you Aidan for pointing that out. Actually, my intention is to have valid() independent from Student. I import it from a separate utils module. It was an accident that I had left it inside the definition of Student. Thanks again for calling my attention on it. –  user1563285 Feb 25 '13 at 18:08
    
I'm still not convinced that's the way to go. Have a look at my updated answer and maybe have another glance at the model validation docs. –  Aidan Ewen Feb 25 '13 at 18:25

2 Answers 2

Both your valid and modify functions should probably be replaced with a clean method.

Have a look at the docs on model validation

UPDATE 1

You could probably drop the valid method altogether and simply call self.clean_feilds() instead. That will validate the fields -

def modify(self, **kwargs):
    try:
        self.clean_fields()
        for k,v in kwargs.iteritems():
            setattr(self, k, v)
        self.save()
    except:
        pass

UPDATE 2

It sounds from your comments that you don't need to call any validation yourself at all. Just call save and then catch the ValidationError thrown if your changes are invalid.

def modify(self, **kwargs):
    try:
        for k,v in kwargs.iteritems():
            setattr(self, k, v)
        self.save()
    except ValidationError:
        #... do something?

It's worth noting that many python programmers prefer the try / except pattern to if valid / then. It's known as the 'better to ask forgiveness than permission' principle (amongst other things it provides protection against race conditions - probably not relevant in this case)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. It looks most concise. Above, I was trying to provide a way to test an individual field, which doesn't sound like a feature the question actually asked for. –  Cole Feb 25 '13 at 18:27
    
I think I see what you're saying. So, when we call self.clean_fields(), it takes the Student instance (self), validates its fields and raises some exception if something doesn't validate. In your example, however, shouldn't we first call the loop on kwargs with setattr, and then call clean_fields on the new look of the guy? And only call self.save() if the cleaning doesn't raise an exception.. –  user1563285 Feb 25 '13 at 19:19
    
I thought (from your code) that you wanted to validate the fields, then set your attributes. If you need to, then perhaps you could validate again with self.full_clean after adding the attributes (but before save). –  Aidan Ewen Feb 25 '13 at 22:46
    
I would basically use this function to modify instances that were created and saved before I call it on them. I suppose the instance was validated (and passed validation) when it was last saved, so this time I only need to check if it still validates with the changes. –  user1563285 Feb 26 '13 at 2:45
    
So just save the object and catch the ValidationError that's thrown if your changes are invalid - you don't need to call valid / clean / anything else - just call save. –  Aidan Ewen Feb 26 '13 at 7:16

Use s or self as needed.

def valid(self, kwargs):
    for k, v in kwargs:
        old_v = self.__dict__[k]
        self.__dict__[k] = v
        try:
            self.save()
            self.__dict__[k] = old_v
            self.save()
        except:
            return False

        return True

There is likely a more direct way to perform your test than an actual 'self.save()' failure, but its a good place to begin.

Alternatively:

field_list = ['s_name', 's_gpa', 's_year', 's_registered']
def valid(self, kwargs):
    for k, v in kwargs:
        exclude_list = [f for f in field_list if f != k]
        try:
            self.clean_fields(exclude=exclude_list)
        except ValidationError:
            return False

        return True

With list comprehension, eliminate the exclude_list line and change the self.clean_fields line to:

self.clean_fields(exclude=[f for f in field_list if f != k])
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