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When I check one radio button, it returns the false option, and it should return the value

<form name="formulario" action="accion.php" method="post">
    <input type="radio" name="opcion" value="1">Opcion 1
    <input type="radio" name="opcion" value="2">Opcion 2
    <input type="button" name="Enviar" value='eviar' onclick="enviar();">
</form>
<script>
function enviar(){
    var di = document.getElementsByName('opcion');
    for(i=0; i <di.length; i++){
        if(di[i].checked==true){
            valorSeleccionado = di[i].value;
            alert(valorSeleccionado);
        }
        if(di[i].checked==false){
            alert('you didn´t choose a option');
        }
    }
}
</script>
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What, exactly, is supposed to happen? What's being returned? –  Christian Stewart Feb 25 '13 at 18:07
    
Please indent your code in a way that makes it readable. –  Domenic Feb 25 '13 at 18:08
    
if i check one option, it returns "you didn´t choose a option", and it should return valorSeleccionado –  jarab Feb 25 '13 at 18:09
    
@jarab, checked works for radio buttons –  harsha Feb 25 '13 at 18:11
2  
It should do both. If you have two radio buttons and loop over both of them, the one that's not checked would run the second alert and the one that is checked would run the first alert. I tested in a jsFiddle and it did exactly that. –  animuson Feb 25 '13 at 18:13
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

function enviar() {
    var di = document.getElementsByName('opcion');
    var valid = false;
    for (i = 0; i < di.length; i++) {
        if (di[i].checked == true && !valid) {
            valorSeleccionado = di[i].value;
            valid = true;
            alert(valorSeleccionado);
        }
    }
    if (!valid) {
        alert('you didn´t choose a option');
    }
}

jsFiddle example

It simply runs through the radio buttons and checks if one is checked. If so it sets a flag and alerts the value, if not, the error is alerted.

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In order to know wich radio is selected you shoud check the value of the "opcion" element. I think checked property dont works for radios, only for checkboxes.

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checked does work for radio buttons... selected is for <select> menus. –  animuson Feb 25 '13 at 18:14
    
another issue is that name attributes should be unique....and you have two name='opcion' input elements. –  rnirnber Feb 25 '13 at 18:14
2  
@rnirnber: Not true. Radio groups require the name to be the same. IDs have to be unique. –  animuson Feb 25 '13 at 18:14
    
Maybe so, but there's a better way to do it. Especially if you're using javascript. IE7's JS engine's document.getElementById selector actually has a bug in it where it falsely returns elements with the name attribute passed to the getElementById method. –  rnirnber Feb 25 '13 at 18:17
    
I just tested the code with chrome dev tools and cheked prop works fine for radios !!¿? –  diegoGarc Feb 25 '13 at 18:17
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You should put your JS function before the html. Plus, your verifications were not really precise..

Here is your corrected code :

<script type="text>
function enviar(){
    var valorSeleccionado = '';
    var di = document.getElementsByName('opcion');
    for(i=0; i <di.length; i++){
        if(di[i].checked==true) {
            valorSeleccionado = di[i].value;
        }
        if(valorSeleccionado) {
            alert(valorSeleccionado);
        } else {
            alert("you didn't choose an option");
        }
        }
}
</script>

<form>
    <input type="radio" name="opcion" value="1" />Opcion 1
    <input type="radio" name="opcion" value="2" />Opcion 2

    <input type="button" value="eviar" onclick="enviar();" />
</form>
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1  
Why would it matter where the function exists as long as it's not called before the elements it references exist? –  j08691 Feb 25 '13 at 18:19
    
It doesn't matter whether the function is before or after the HTML. By the time the user can click on the button the function will be defined. –  Barmar Feb 25 '13 at 18:19
1  
Also, this doesn't really solve the double alert problem. If the user checks the first one, they will get two alerts with the value of the radio. If they check the second one, they will get the "choose an option" alert message followed by an alert with the value. –  animuson Feb 25 '13 at 18:20
    
If you have a really laggy connection, it could matter, right? –  Pye Feb 25 '13 at 18:21
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