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The method below does the job, but it's not very efficient.

Does anyone know a more elegant solution to do this?

I have fumbled with something like this but no luck so far: /^(foo|bar|[[:space:][:punct:]])+$/

static public boolean matchTitle(String title, String title2) {

    Scanner scanner1 = new Scanner(title);
    Scanner scanner2 = new Scanner(title2);
    String searchTitle = title2;
    boolean match = false;
    int i = 0;
    while(i < 2){
        if(i == 1){
            scanner1 = new Scanner(title2);
            scanner2 = new Scanner(title);
            searchTitle = title;
        }

        // breaks into words
        while (scanner1.hasNext()){
            match = false;

            String token = scanner1.next();
            scanner2 = new Scanner(searchTitle);
            while (scanner2.hasNext() && !match){
                String token2 = scanner2.next();
                if(token.equals(token2)){
                    // if the words match
                    match = true;
                }
            }
            if(!match){ // we have a word that didn't match any words in the second title
                return false;
            }
        }
        i++;
    }
    return true;
}

Example

("similar words here", "similar words here") // true

("similar words here", "words here similar here") // true

("similar words here", "similar words here different") // false

share|improve this question
3  
Please provide example inputs that you expect for each case (true/false). –  Matt Ball Feb 25 '13 at 18:20
    
Example : ("similar words here", "similar words here") // true ("similar words here", "words here similar here") // true ("similar words here", "similar words here different") // false –  Jon Berger Feb 25 '13 at 18:21
1  
Are you hellbent on using regex to achieve this? –  pcalcao Feb 25 '13 at 18:21
1  
How do you deal with repeats, e.g. ("similar similar words", "similar words")? –  chm Feb 25 '13 at 18:24
    
that example doesn't help.. –  Anirudha Feb 25 '13 at 18:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would go for a simpler version:

List<String> words1 = Arrays.asList(title.split(" "));
List<String> words2 = Arrays.asList(title2.split(" "));

return words1.containsAll(words2) &&
       words2.containsAll(words1);

Assumptions:

  • title and title2 are non null
  • space is the only delimiter
  • if a string contains the same word n times, the other must contain that word n times too

EDIT

Your edit shows that duplicates are fine. In which case you can use a set instead of a list:

Set<String> words1 = new HashSet<String> (Arrays.asList(title.split(" ")));
Set<String> words2 = new HashSet<String> (Arrays.asList(title2.split(" ")));

return words1.size() == words2.size() && words1.containsAll(words2);

Note: as indicated by chm052 in his answer, in the case of Sets, you can simply check for equality, which ignores the order (but not in the List example):

return words1.equals(words2);
share|improve this answer
    
"if a string contains the same word twice, the other must contain that word twice too" - is that true? Or does it just need to have /one/ of the words twice (so it's the same length)? Actually, would this falsely output true for ("one two three", "one two two")? –  chm Feb 25 '13 at 18:29
    
@chm052 both versions would output false. –  assylias Feb 25 '13 at 18:30
    
My first post, haha you guys are on it, and rough. It's ok I'm a SOF newb. Thanks a ton assylias, this solution works great and I noticed at least a 10x increase in my app by replacing my method with this. –  Jon Berger Feb 25 '13 at 18:39
    
@JonBerger Glad it helped - your original algorithm was O(n^2) whereas this one is O(n), so it should be faster. –  assylias Feb 25 '13 at 18:42
    
Could the downvoter comment? –  assylias Feb 25 '13 at 18:49

What you are asking is wether the set of words in the first string is equal to the set of words in the second string. After all, the things you want to ignore about the string (word order and repeated words) don't exist in sets by definition.

So, you need

Set<String> words1 = new HashSet<String> (Arrays.asList(title.split(" ")));
Set<String> words2 = new HashSet<String> (Arrays.asList(title2.split(" ")));

return words1.equals(words2);

EDIT:

As assylias pointed out, there's no big change in functionality if you switch use the equals method rather than the size and containsAll methods, but it's easier to understand when reading the code. It's also probably better OO practice to decouple this method with the set class in this way; then, for example, if a better algorithm for finding deep set equality is implemented in the Java set class, you'll get to use that improvement.

BONUS SECOND EDIT:

If anyone is confused by the comment thread on this, it's about this previous answer by assylias (and wether or not it will work in every case):

List<String> words1 = Arrays.asList(title.split(" "));
List<String> words2 = Arrays.asList(title2.split(" "));
return words1.size() == words2.size() && words1.containsAll(words2);
share|improve this answer
    
As commented above, the list version will output false on matchTitle("one two two", "one two three")); - In particular, words1.containsAll(words2) will be false. –  assylias Feb 25 '13 at 18:50
    
But agreed with your second code, in the case of a List, containsAll was necessary to ignore order of the words, but in the case of Set, equals is order agnostic. –  assylias Feb 25 '13 at 18:52
    
@chm052 Thanks for this edit, this works. I don't know am I suppose to change the answer to this, I can't even arrow up click you because it's a new account. Heh I dunno well thanks everyone it works –  Jon Berger Feb 25 '13 at 19:04
    
For the sake of completeness, words1.equals(words2); will be slightly slower than words1.size() == words2.size() && words1.containsAll(words2);, since equals does use that exact same condition, but only after having performed a few additional checks. In most situations you won't notice the difference and should go for the more readable version (i.e. equals). –  assylias Feb 25 '13 at 19:15
1  
@assylias, the example I gave is ("one two three", "one two two"), not ("one two two", "one two three") as you commented, which will work just fine. The problem is that if there are repeated words in s2, then you can have 1. all words in s2 also in s1, and 2. the same number of words in s2 as s1, but /also words in s1 that do not appear in s2/. Why don't you just try it - I did as a sanity check and your program outputs true for me in that case. –  chm Feb 25 '13 at 19:19

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