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I have the following class definition:

var gameEngine = WinJS.Namespace.define("GameEngine", {    

interaction: WinJS.Class.define(
    function() {},
    {
        destination: 0,
        currentXPos: 0,
        handleTouch: function handleTouch(event) {
            this.destination = event.x;
            console.log("New destination: " + this.destination);
        }
    }
),
...

And I'm trying to use the handleTouch function here:

WinJS.Namespace.define("drawScreen", {

DrawScreen: WinJS.Class.define(function DrawScreen() {
    canvas.addEventListener("MSPointerUp", gameEngine.interaction.handleTouch, false);

...

The problem seems to be that gameEngine.interaction.handleTouch is undefined. Clearly I've not declared or called the interaction class correctly - but looking at documentation here, I can't see what I've done wrong.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you've defined gameEngine.interaction as a class with your members in the instance declaration, you need to instantiate an instance of it first. Therefore you'd need to do something like this:

var gameInteraction = new gameEngine.interaction();
canvas.addEventListener("MSPointerUp", gameInteraction.handleTouch, false);

If you define all of the interaction class members directly inside of the Namespace instead of in a Class, you wouldn't need to instantiate it. Another alternative would be to instantiate the class directly in your namespace like:

var gameEngine = WinJS.Namespace.define("GameEngine", {    

interaction: new WinJS.Class.define(
...
share|improve this answer
    
Your second suggestion doesn't make any difference - it still sees the constituent function as undefined. The first works fine though - thanks. – pm_2 Feb 26 '13 at 8:22

The first argument to WinJS.Class.define( is the constructor function, while the second is the member properties and functions. Try this:

interaction: WinJS.Class.define(
    function() {},
    {
        // initialize your class here
    }, 
    {
        destination: 0,
        currentXPos: 0,
        handleTouch: function handleTouch(event) {
            this.destination = event.x;
            console.log("New destination: " + this.destination);
        }
    }
),
...
share|improve this answer
    
To clarify what you've done here is to shift the variables down from the instance members declaration into the static members declaration for the class. This should also be a viable alternative to the two other suggestions I posted. – GotDibbs Feb 25 '13 at 18:57

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