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Answer

As Sergey pointed out, class Model(**kwargs) is invalid, and is a typo in Django documentation.
The "class" part comes from the markup they used when they wrote it.

So, what they actually meant in the Django documentation is:

Creating objects

To create a new instance of a model, just instantiate it like any other Python class:

Model(**kwargs)

The keyword arguments are simply the names of the fields you’ve defined on your model. Note that instantiating a model in no way touches your database; for that, you need to save().




Original question

I found the following while reading the Django Docs about Model instances:

Creating objects

To create a new instance of a model, just instantiate it like any other Python class:

class Model(**kwargs)

The keyword arguments are simply the names of the fields you’ve defined on your model. Note that instantiating a model in no way touches your database; for that, you need to save().


What is the difference between these two codes?

class Model(**kwargs)
new_model = Model(**kwargs)


I know the second one creates a new instance of the class Model, with kwargs.
Is the first one different from it? To me, it seems like it rather redefines the Model class.

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1  
The first one is incorrect –  Denis Nikanorov Feb 25 '13 at 20:05
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

class Model(**kwargs) is not a valid Python syntax, the latter would look like

class Model(SomeBaseClass):
    pass

Judging by the formatting (the line looks like a subheading), this must be a mistake in the Django documentation.

If you look at the Sphinx source of the page, you'll see that the "class" thing is actually a part of Sphinx markup. What they meant is

To create a new instance of a model, just instantiate it like any other Python class:

Model(**kwargs)

The keyword arguments are simply the names of the fields you've defined on your model.

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Thank you, Sergey, I appreciate you took the time to write a clear answer on the question. –  user1563285 Feb 25 '13 at 21:12
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The first line defines a class. The second line defines an instance of a class.

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1  
The first line is invalid. –  wRAR Feb 25 '13 at 20:09
1  
Yes, I know, but not to be to rude, obviously the OP has absolutely NO IDEA what OOP is. –  Brandon Feb 25 '13 at 20:19
    
Brandon, I'm in the process of learning about OOP, and my question to me is part of this process. For what I have learnt, in Python we define a class by "class ClassName(AncestorName): class_definition" and create an instance of a class by "ClassName(**kwargs)". What my question referred to was something I hadn't seen before. I searched it on the web and on SO, and since I didn't find an answer, I asked it here. If it really is a typo in Django documentation, then I believe that my question will be useful for anyone who may get confused by it. Anyway, I will edit it with the answer. –  user1563285 Feb 25 '13 at 20:42
    
Sorry to be curt, but you really should get familiar with the basics of Python before diving into Django. Defining and instantiating classes is Python 101. –  Brandon Feb 25 '13 at 20:46
1  
I'm working on it, man. But, regardless of my knowledge, I still believe the question (completed with the answer) will be useful for anyone who runs into such a typo. –  user1563285 Feb 25 '13 at 20:59
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