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I'm trying to make an OS X app, and for some reason, I can't find anything on how to add items to the Main Menu (File, Edit, etc), and how to actually handle those actions. Everything I've found is how to implement a Status Bar application, which is not what I want. Can anyone help?

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The menu bar is part of your application's MainMenu.nib, and can be edited there. Like other user interface objects, each menu item has a target which can be configured to control what it does.

A video tutorial is available here. (I'm not usually a fan of videos, but this one is so perfectly on-target that I'm making an exception.)

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Or you can get to it programmatically via -[NSApp mainMenu] from anywhere in your app. –  Joshua Nozzi Feb 25 '13 at 20:43
    
@JoshuaNozzi: That's not how you'd typically manipulate it, though, especially not if all you're trying to do is add a new menu item. :) Even if you needed to make modifications to the menu, there's usually better ways of doing it (like having outlets to the menu items you need to manipulate). –  duskwuff Feb 25 '13 at 21:08
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No, not usually, but the OP didn't specify what he was looking for and this is a perfectly valid thing to do. One example off the top of my head (which is no longer as relevant, given the App Store), is a "Buy" or "Register" menu that's injected if unregistered (or removed if registered) at runtime. Never assume you know everything someone wants to do ... –  Joshua Nozzi Feb 25 '13 at 23:14
    
For situations like that, the recommended solution is to have both items always present in the menu, and hide it in code if it's not applicable (via an outlet, as mentioned above). Digging through the whole menubar in code is much more fragile. –  duskwuff Feb 26 '13 at 0:00
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Recommended != correct. Flexibility is better than blind adherence to design guidelines set by a company that routinely ignores them itself. –  Joshua Nozzi Feb 26 '13 at 2:10

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