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I have something like this in my code. Now the method is suppose to return an enum type. However not all code paths return a value. I would like to resolve this issue and at the same time I want the debugger to alert me that (ie) assertion that no enum type can be returned in case it goes into else (the 3rd condition in the code). Normally I would add another enum type for the else condition and check the returned value but I wanted to know if there was a better way doing this.

        private enumType AdjustType(someo_object q)
        {
            if(q.val.Equals("M"))
            {
                return enumType.FirstType;
            }
            else if (q.val.Equals("N"))
            {
                return enumType.SecondType;
            }
            else
            {
                return null; //This isnt allowed - I would like something like an assertion here
            }
        }
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have several options:

  1. Throw an exception. This is appropriate when you know the input is invalid (e.g. because of a bug in the calling code).

    throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot convert from Q to MyEnum.");
    
  2. Use a nullable type. This is appropriate when there is no valid result from the operation (e.g. because of invalid user input or a situation that is not a bug).

    private MyEnum? AdjustType(object q)
    {
        // ...
        else
            return null;
    }
    
  3. Add a None value to the enum and return that:

    public enum MyEnum
    {
        None = 0,
        First,
        Second
    }
    

(Note that it is always recommended to add such a value, as can be read here.)


If there are values for incoming arguments that are never valid for your method, you should check those at the start of the method and throw ArgumentException or one of its derived classes when the value is invalid. Then you can assume for the rest of your method that the incoming values are valid, which makes your code cleaner. This is how I like to program such methods:

private MyEnum AdjustType(object q)
{
    #region Contract
    if (q == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("q");
    if (q.Value != "M" && q.Value != "N")
        throw new ArgumentException("Value must be M or N.", "q");
    #endregion

    // Here all incoming arguments are valid and within range.
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

I would just throw ArgumentException - and probably do it via a switch:

private enumType AdjustType(someo_object q)
{
    switch (q.val)
    {
        case "M": return enumType.FirstType;
        case "N": return enumType.SecondType;
        default : throw new ArgumentException(...);
    }
}

I would personally prefer this over using Debug.Assert - where you'd have to return something anyway, and then the error could propagate when assertions are turned off in release builds.

Another alternative is to just have a Dictionary<string, enumType> - you may be happy enough to let the KeyNotFoundException propagate. (It depends on your context.)

share|improve this answer
    
Given the Dictionary suggestion you might as well go the full hog and just make the enum an enum of Char, then just parse the bad boy to enumType. :) – Aron Feb 25 '13 at 20:46

You could always use a nullable version of the enum:

private enumType? AdjustType(someo_object q)
share|improve this answer
    
Or use f# option type: langexplr.blogspot.com/2008/06/using-f-option-types-in-c.html – rkrahl Feb 25 '13 at 20:20

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