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UPDATE:
After having tried it again, it turns out that the script works exactly as it should. I must have been too tired and doing something stupid that lead me to think the script was wrong when it was in fact me myself. :-(
Many thx for your help chepner, shellter, William, glenn and Jonathan, I guess my confusion was in fact triggered somehow by me executing the find on the current directory "."
Thx for for hints!

This thread is ready to be closed.

Consider the following:

find . | grep -E ".*\.log$"

If this is run at the command line, it works as expected, namely printing out all directories and files that end in .log

However when in a script, for example:

#!/bin/sh
find . | grep -E ".*\.log$"

it fails. When turning on set -x to inspect, I noticed that during the script execution the regular expression .*.log$ is (auto-??) quoted with single quotes, like:

\+ find .
\+ grep -E '.*\.log$'

even though my code contains double quotes. How can I prevent this?

RESTRICTIONS:

  • The challenge is to use both find and grep, no other cmds allowed
  • Again, the challenge is to use both, not only find, as someone might want to advise
  • Further info, the regular expression to be used for grep is much more complicated as the one shown here (several OR separated RegExps), I simplified it here because the annoyance happens with this one already

I've been working on this over 4 hours without results. I've searched Google and StackOverflow but I found nothing similar. I fear that the solution is incredibly easy and I am just too stupid to find it? :-(

Any help appreciated, thx in advance!

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1  
The shell is just echoing the command in a canonical form. '.*.log$' and ".*\\.log$" produce equivalent strings. What do you mean by "fails"? No output? Incorrect output, and if so, what is it? Also, are you running the script from the same directory from which you run the find command? –  chepner Feb 25 '13 at 21:01
    
yes, don't worry about '.*\.log$', that's just a standarized way of displaying the trace information. Add an echo $PWD before the find cmd in your script, and I'll be you see that you're not starting your search in the directory you think you're in. –  shellter Feb 25 '13 at 21:11
    
The only thing your double quotes are doing in this case is turning "\\." into "\.", and that's what you're seeing in the -x output (and what you want). –  William Feb 25 '13 at 21:15
1  
Your find location is "." -- the current directory. Is your script located in the right place? Do you need to cd within the script? –  glenn jackman Feb 25 '13 at 21:40
    
@chepner what I meant by "fails" was, that it simply printed out everything, rather then only the log files as I had expected it. –  Face Feb 26 '13 at 10:25

1 Answer 1

What OS and executable verions are you using?

Your little script:

#!/bin/sh
find . | grep -E ".*\.log$"

or

#!/bin/bash
find . | grep -E ".*\.log$"

works perfectly (either single or double backslashes) for me on Debian Wheezy with

yba@tavas:~$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.2.37(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>

This is free software; you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
yba@tavas:~$ grep --version
grep (GNU grep) 2.12
Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>.
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Written by Mike Haertel and others, see <http://git.sv.gnu.org/cgit/grep.git/tree/AUTHORS>.

In what sense does your script fail?

Here is sample output:

yba@tavas:~$ ./st.sh 
./Downloads/serial_update_rev11.log
./.virt-manager/virt-manager.log
./Android/adt-bundle-linux/eclipse/configuration/org.eclipse.update/install.log
./Android/workspace/.metadata/.plugins/org.eclipse.cdt.core/.log
./Android/workspace/.metadata/.log
./ti-dvsdk_dm365-evm_4_02_00_06/xdctools_3_16_03_36/eclipse/plugins   /org.eclipse.rtsc.xdctools.product_3.16.3.36/META-INF/Make.log
./ti-dvsdk_dm365-evm_4_02_00_06/codecs-dm365_4_02_00_00/packages/ittiam/codecs/g711_dec    /hs_err_pid17410.log
./.local/share/gvfs-metadata/root-dfdae0ca.log
./.local/share/gvfs-metadata/label-AR7266WnX\x20V2_1.2-a6becf19.log
./.local/share/gvfs-metadata/home-2def37e1.log
./.local/share/gvfs-metadata/uuid-5c7747c5-81e5-4464-bae0-2c61afc73da4-7a539d2d.log
 ./.local/share/tracker/tracker-store.log
./.local/share/tracker/tracker-miner-fs.log
./.local/share/tracker/tracker-extract.log
yba@tavas:~$
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks Jonathan, you are absolutely right, I dont know why but suddenly the script works exactly the way I expected it, even though I didnt change a thing. I must have been far too tired and doing something stupid leading me to think the script was wrong when it was in fact me myself. :-( –  Face Feb 26 '13 at 10:32

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