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I'm have the strangest behavior with linq to entity / Json / MVC.net 4

I have this bit of code, and for some odd reason, every other list's property order is reversed.

var output = db.FooBar.Where(a => a.lookupFoo == bar)
                      .Select(a => new List<double>{
                                     //value's are the same per row 
                                     //for demonstration sake.
                          a.fooBarA,  //Always 12.34
                          a.fooBarB,  //Always 12.34
                          a.fooBarC,  //Always 0
                          a.fooBarD  //Always 0 //lazy casting to double from int
                      });
return Json(new {output});

output looks like so:

{
  "output": [
    [12.34, 12.34, 0,     0], 
    [0,     0,     12.34, 12.34], 
    [12.34, 12.34, 0,     0],
    [0,     0,     12.34, 12.34]
  ]
};

I've managed to work around it by putting a toList() between the Where, and Select, but I'd still like to know why this behavior is happening.

More info: EF 4.4 (tt generated Context), SQL Server 2008r2 express .NET 4.0, MVC 3.0, Vanilla System.Web.Mvc.JsonResult, table consists of a int primary key, floats for values excluding last one which is a int

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2  
In your example, it's not order of objects that is flipped. Apparently values of properties on single object are switched(?). a.fooBarA holds value of a.fooBarC. Can you make example (or description) clear? –  Nenad Feb 25 '13 at 21:05
1  
Properties cannot be switched by Linq, so problem must be something else that is not obvious from your example. Evil, yes. That's why I stopped writing answers, only comments. :P –  Nenad Feb 25 '13 at 22:32
1  
Nope, can't reproduce using MVC4 and default Json serializer. –  Alex Paven Feb 25 '13 at 23:50
1  
Seems like another outer variable trap stackoverflow.com/questions/3416758/outer-variable-trap –  Onur May 24 '13 at 20:24
1  
To debug this further, what's the result if you change the .Select to .Select(a => new List<double>{1.0,2.0,3.0,4.0})? –  Mark Hurd Jun 1 '13 at 6:19

2 Answers 2

Try

var output = db.FooBar.Where(a => a.lookupFoo == bar)
                  .Select(a => new List<double>{
                                 //value's are the same per row 
                                 //for demonstration sake.
                      a.fooBarA,  //Always 12.34
                      a.fooBarB,  //Always 12.34
                      a.fooBarC,  //Always 0
                      a.fooBarD  //Always 0 //lazy casting to double from int
                  }).toList();
return Json(output);

On your way output just context the generated script for get data may be it Excute manytime in size Json()

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Add a .ToArray and see what you get. Remember that the linq (Select.. exc) is only executed when IEnumerator is called.

I think if you add ToArray, the result would be the same each time, and consistent.

Hope that helps.

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